The surname 'molaoa: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is 'molaoa, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname 'molaoa. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname 'molaoa belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the 'molaoa surname.

The heraldry of 'molaoa, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname 'molaoa in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname 'molaoa, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname 'molaoa for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of 'molaoa

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the 'molaoa surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the 'molaoa surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the 'molaoa surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the 'molaoa surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of 'molaoa.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname 'molaoa

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the 'molaoa surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the 'molaoa coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the 'molaoa heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the 'molaoa coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Appendix - 1. This term is applied to animals when represented with the limbs, tail, horns and nails of different enamel.
  • Bar - 1. Piece that diagonally crosses the shield from the left angle superior to the lower right angle. Honorable or first order piece. Its width must occupy a third of the shield. The bars if your number exceeds the four are called Li
  • Bread - 1. Said by some to the bezantes or roeles who present themselves with a fine cross or blade in its center, to mean bread.
  • Center of the boss. - 1. It is said of the head point of the boss. Honorable piece.
  • Cruz de Avis - 1. Cruz Flordelisada de sinople, adopted by the Portuguese order of Avis.
  • Montesa, order of - 1. Substitute military order of that of the Temple, created in 1317. Its badge, Modern Montesa Cruz, is equal to that of its congeners of Alcantara and Calatrava, of Saber, with a flat cross of gules loading it.
  • narrow boss - 1. He who has two thirds of his ordinary width.
  • Quoted - 1. Narrow or decreased first -degree band, reduced to half of its width, some heraldists are from the opinion, which has to be the third part to the band or 1/9 of the width of the blazon. Diminished honorable piece.
  • Rodete - 1. Braid or cord that surrounds the upper part of the helmet. (V. Bureaule).
  • See you in stick - 1. Said of seeing you put in a stick situation.
  • Sinister-Barra canton - 1. Composite piece resulting from the union of the sinister canton and the bar.
  • Sparkling - 1. It is said of the piece that ends in acute tips. (V. vibrate).
  • vane - 1. Species of dress or headdress of the head, like a lambrequin called weather vane or steering wheel by the old heralds, tied behind the helmet with a bandage or braid composed of tapes and cords intertwined with the colors of the shield, turned to the w
  • Vídamo - 1. Ecclesiastical lawyer appointed by the King of France, who subsequently passed to the lay man with the obligation to defend ecclesiastical goods.