The surname Aarhus: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Aarhus, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Aarhus. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Aarhus belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Aarhus surname.

The heraldry of Aarhus, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Aarhus in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Aarhus, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Aarhus for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Aarhus

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Aarhus surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Aarhus surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Aarhus surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Aarhus surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Aarhus.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Aarhus

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Aarhus surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Aarhus coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Aarhus heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Aarhus coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Aguila explained. - 1. It is applied to eagles when they have two heads, and extended wings. According to some authors, such as Father Menestier, he understands this term to all the aguilas that have extended eagles.
  • Band Head - 1. It is the result of the union of the boss and the band.
  • boss over - (V. Surmonted Chief).
  • Cave - 1. It is represented in irregular semicircle loaded on a mountain, of different enamel.
  • Corbo - 1. Term used by some authors to designate the Roque. (V. Roque).
  • Crown of the Kings of Aragon - 1. Equal to the Spanish Royal Crown, but without any headband.
  • Cruz de San Andrés - 1. Cross formed by two crossbars placed in Aspa. (V. Cruz Aspa).
  • Eagle - 1. There are countless designs and representations. Except description to the contrary, its regular position is with the wings extended and raised, the tail low and scattered, sometimes it is represented crowned and sometimes, that is, with the
  • Hunting - 1. Term used by some authors, said by the animal that is represented in action to hunt.
  • Lynx - 1. The lynx that usually appears in the blazons does not present the fur stained with dark moles, such as the one known in Spain, but similar to the African, of uniform leonia layer and a little larger than the European. Sight symbol and by definition D
  • Party and potent - 1. It is said of the party formed by Potenzas.
  • pink - 1. It is said of the shield or figure sown of roses.
  • Pyre - 1. Triangle whose base is at the tip of the shield, being a 1/3 width and its vertex ends in the center of the boss. Honorable first order. 2. Erroneously by some by tip. Symbol of righteousness.
  • Royal Crown of Portugal - 1. Similar to the Spanish Royal Crown. (See Spanish Royal Corona).
  • Tahalí - 1. Wide leather band that is held from the right shoulder to the waist and that holds the sword.
  • Triumphal crown - 1. With bay leaves. Victory symbol. Army generals were granted that they had won in some important battle defeating the enemy.
  • unmocked - 1. Tree whose cup appears flat. 2. Cabria or Chevron with the cut tip. 3. Every figure or furniture in which a piece of the top has been cut. (V. Moving, infamous).
  • Vallar - 1. It is said of the Vallar Crown which some of its components have been modified imitating the Paliza. (V. Corona Vallar).