The surname Abbot: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Abbot, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Abbot. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Abbot belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Abbot surname.

The heraldry of Abbot, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Abbot in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Abbot, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Abbot for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Abbot

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Abbot surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Abbot surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Abbot surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Abbot surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Abbot.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Abbot

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Abbot surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Abbot coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Abbot heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Abbot coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Aguila of Italy - 1. It is represented with only one head, separate wings, but not raised and glued tail.
  • Barbican - 1. Saetera or tronera in castles or strengths.
  • Branches - 1. Tree branches are generally represented with sinople, fruit or leafy color.
  • Cantado - 1. When a main piece is accompanied by another in the cantons of the shield. Generally the Cross or the Sotuer accompanied by four pieces or figures arranged in the flanks between the arms 2. It is said of four figures or furniture placed in the four
  • Compted - 1. It is said of the piece that is composed in alternation with calls called compes, color and metal in a single row, you have to list the amount of them. In the case of an edge, composses can be irregular, it is advisable to indicate them.
  • decreasing - 1. The growing whose tips look to the sinister side.
  • Harp - 1. It is wrongly said by some heraldists by Dante. (See Dantelado).
  • House - 1. It is usually painted with the door, accompanied by two windows. It symbolizes hospitality and security.
  • Lobbying - 1. Said of the eagle that is held with obstacles or wooden sticks. (See lock, work-o).
  • Lord - 1. Honorary title with which members of the high English nobility are distinguished.
  • Orders - 1. Term used to designate the number of pieces, equal belts repeating with alternateness between metal and color.
  • Potenza - 1. Figure that ends in the form of “T”.
  • Prince's helmet - 1. Golden helmet, ajar, lined with gules and front.
  • Saber - 1. Name given to the black color used in heraldry, graphically represented by a vertical scratch and another horizontal forming a grid. There is a belief that blazons that carry this color are obliged to help those who have no