The surname Abderzak: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Abderzak, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Abderzak. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Abderzak belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Abderzak surname.

The heraldry of Abderzak, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Abderzak in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Abderzak, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Abderzak for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Abderzak

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Abderzak surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Abderzak surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Abderzak surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Abderzak surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Abderzak.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Abderzak

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Abderzak surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Abderzak coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Abderzak heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Abderzak coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Band belt - 1. Piece that consists of the union of the girdle and the lower part of the band.
  • Bicuciferous - 1. It is the result of a full and narrow cross, highlighted on a Sotuer or a flanquis.
  • Cruz Aspa - 1. Cross in which its crossbars form a blade. (See Cruz de San Andrés).
  • Domus - 1. House or tower that is represented as a castle with two towers. Its heraldic design depends on the armature of each country.
  • Flank - 1. They are the sides of the shield called right -handed side and sinister side. (V. flank).
  • gibelin - 1. Term used to designate the merletas of a building when they carry a notch or cleft in their upper part.
  • Gironado in Sotuer - (V. Jironado in Aspa).
  • gules - 1. Heraldic name of the red color. It is represented graphically by vertical lines. Symbol: Value, strength and intrepidity and faith of the martyrs. 2. It exists in the French and German armories of the fourteent
  • Lobbying - 1. Said of the eagle that is held with obstacles or wooden sticks. (See lock, work-o).
  • Marquis helmet - 1. Front, silver, lined with gules and with seven grids, bordura and grilles, stuck with gold.
  • mister - 1. Treatment that was given in Spain who was the head of a manor. 1. Nobiliar title that in some countries amounted to Barón and in others it was lower.
  • miter - 1. properly ecclesiastical figure or headdress used by the Pope of Rome in the great religious ceremonies, bishops, abbots, represented with gold or silver, with the gold or silver ines.
  • Noble genealogy - 1. History and research of families in their origins whose weapons appear or have the right to appear in the books called Blassonarians, noble, armorials.
  • Party and potent - 1. It is said of the party formed by Potenzas.
  • Pond - 1. It is represented in several ways, usually by an oval space or irregular shapes full of azur or silver water similar to a lake.
  • Priestly crown - 1. Several subjects were made, mainly olive tree and spikes.
  • Princess - 1. The infantas of Spain bring their shield in Losanje, with a crown of an infant, putting the full and non -split weapons, adorned with two green palms, such as the queens.
  • Quartered - 1. Term used by some old heraldists to define the quarter. (V. Quarter).
  • Raising - 1. It is said of a piece or part of a piece that is placed at a higher height from which it corresponds, especially the girdle or the cabrio.
  • Rampante Leon - 1. The rampant lion is the most used figure in the Spanish heraldry, and to a lesser extent in the European, its position is the one lifted on its hind rooms with the front claws in an attack position. (See rampant).
  • vane - 1. Species of dress or headdress of the head, like a lambrequin called weather vane or steering wheel by the old heralds, tied behind the helmet with a bandage or braid composed of tapes and cords intertwined with the colors of the shield, turned to the w
  • Vervesor, Valvasor, VarVassor - 1. Terms used in some 16th -century Catalan manuscripts in Catalonia. In the feudal era vasallo of another vassal. 2. It also applied to a vassal that had a lower range. In Catalonia they were the last category of their own feudal lords