The surname Beteler: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Beteler, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Beteler. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Beteler belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Beteler surname.

The heraldry of Beteler, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Beteler in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Beteler, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Beteler for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Beteler

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Beteler surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Beteler surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Beteler surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Beteler surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Beteler.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Beteler

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Beteler surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Beteler coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Beteler heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Beteler coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Aguila explained. - 1. It is applied to eagles when they have two heads, and extended wings. According to some authors, such as Father Menestier, he understands this term to all the aguilas that have extended eagles.
  • Bretesada battery - 1. Bretested battery is understood as it is formed by bretes. (V. Bretesado).
  • Burgundy. - 1. This term is usually referred to the blade of this name. Call for some authors, it is an ebrancada blade that consists of two cross pieces, each of the width of the middle of them, both forming a blade. (V. Burgundy).
  • Capital - 1. Ornamental piece located at the end and at the beginning of the columns. It is normally represented naturally.
  • Chained - 1. Said of a person or animal is tied with a chain of a given enamel. If they are animals such as lions, bears, lebre them, etc., the enamel will be indicated as long as it is not iron (saber).
  • Contrafilete - 1. It is said of the piece that wears two fillets. (V. fillet, threchor).
  • Crenellated to gibelin. - 1. Type of encouragement with the aged battlements, typical of the Italian medieval heraldry and widely used in Catalonia.
  • Extraordinary partition - 1. It is the partition formed by the slice the trchado and the slide. Very rare partition in the Spanish and European and difficult Blasonar heraldry. 2. Partition formed by the cut, party and semiparite towards the tip.
  • Fish - (V. Fish).
  • Furious - 1. It is said of the bull, cow or another quadruped animal in rampant attitude, raised by its hind legs. (V. agitated).
  • Home of paratge - 1. Hidalgo de Cataluña. Equivalent to the Hidalgo de Castilla and the Infanzón in Aragon
  • mister - 1. Treatment that was given in Spain who was the head of a manor. 1. Nobiliar title that in some countries amounted to Barón and in others it was lower.
  • Montesa, order of - 1. Substitute military order of that of the Temple, created in 1317. Its badge, Modern Montesa Cruz, is equal to that of its congeners of Alcantara and Calatrava, of Saber, with a flat cross of gules loading it.
  • Open - 1. The windows and doors of castles, towers or other figures when through them the field of the shield or the enamel of the piece they had below is seen. The rustters, macles and stars or rosettes that the spurs carry, as it is
  • Royal Crown of Poland - 1. Similar to the Spanish, surmontada of a silver eagle.
  • Skip - 1. Piece covered with scales such as fish or siren, usually of different enamel.