The surname Betterley: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Betterley, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Betterley. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Betterley belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Betterley surname.

The heraldry of Betterley, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Betterley in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Betterley, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Betterley for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Betterley

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Betterley surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Betterley surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Betterley surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Betterley surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Betterley.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Betterley

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Betterley surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Betterley coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Betterley heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Betterley coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Camba - 1. Said by some authors to the wheels of the cars.
  • Carapeteiro - 1. Genuine tree of the Portuguese heraldry which carries seven arms. Its use is purely heraldic. (V. CREQUIL).
  • Cordada - 1. When a musical instrument carries strings being of different metal it is said cord. 2. Also said of the stunned arc string.
  • Cruz Aspa - 1. Cross in which its crossbars form a blade. (See Cruz de San Andrés).
  • Filleted - 1. Piece whose edges are silhued or profiled from different enamel.
  • Flambante - 1. Palos, belts and wave bands that finish on the tip are understood as if they were flames. It derives from the Latin voice "Flamula", by the flame, however, our heralds want flambantes view of the French voice "flamb". (V. Flameante
  • Flank - 1. They are the sides of the shield called right -handed side and sinister side. (V. flank).
  • Fused. - 1. It applies to trees whose trunk and branches are of different enamel than their trunk. 2. When the spear, itch, flag, it carries the handle or support of a different enamel than its own.
  • Human figures - 1. They include heads, eye, nose, mouth, ear, bust, shoulder, arm, open hand, fist, linked hands, breasts, whole body, leg, foot, heart, etc. Generally they should not be introduced into the blazons whole human figures but only member
  • Nailed - 1. It is said of the piece, whose nails are of different enamel than the main figure.
  • Natural poster - 1. Cartela represented by means of a strip rolled at its ends.
  • Quadrifolio - 1. Figure that represents a flower of four leaves or rounded petals and finishes on a slight tip, perforated in its center. It resembles the four -leaf clover. Used in the Central European Heraldic.
  • Ready - 1. term used by some authors to designate the listel. (V. Listel).
  • Shield field - 1. Space or surface that forms the interior of the shield, on which the different elements that form the shield such as the pieces and figures are distributed. (V. partitions).
  • Tahalí - 1. Wide leather band that is held from the right shoulder to the waist and that holds the sword.
  • trace - 1. Name that some Italian traders give to Lambel. (V. Lambel).
  • Vídamo - 1. Ecclesiastical lawyer appointed by the King of France, who subsequently passed to the lay man with the obligation to defend ecclesiastical goods.
  • Vívora - 1. Snake. It is represented, put in stick and waved or only showing neck and head out of a boiler, in its handles or in vases, copones or finishing a cross or other pieces, then they are called in the heraldic language gringolate. Sum