The surname Betzabeth: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Betzabeth, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Betzabeth. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Betzabeth belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Betzabeth surname.

The heraldry of Betzabeth, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Betzabeth in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Betzabeth, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Betzabeth for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Betzabeth

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Betzabeth surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Betzabeth surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Betzabeth surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Betzabeth surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Betzabeth.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Betzabeth

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Betzabeth surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Betzabeth coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Betzabeth heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Betzabeth coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Adommed - 1. When one piece is loaded with another. Disused term. (V. adorned).
  • Belgium Crown - 1. Similar to the Spanish and that of Bavaria. (See Crown of Bavaria, Spanish Corona).
  • Bipartite cross - 1. Cruz at whose ends are matches or separate.
  • Chained - 1. Said of a person or animal is tied with a chain of a given enamel. If they are animals such as lions, bears, lebre them, etc., the enamel will be indicated as long as it is not iron (saber).
  • Crossed - 1. Apply to the pieces that carry an overlapping cross. 2. It is said of the gentleman that enlisted for some crusade. 3. It is said of any figure that at its upper end is added a cross, usually the globe and flags.
  • Cruz-Barra - 1. It is said of the piece that is composed of the Union of the Cross and the bar.
  • diademada - 1. It is understood as the person or any other religious figure or not to carry a circle around the head such as the Imperial Eagles and the Lion of Venice. (V. Nimbo).
  • espalier - 1. Said by some writer to point out the lattice, key to another enamel, for example, in the surname Trussel. Of gules, a back, closed of gold.
  • High faith - 1. Ancient authors used this phrase to designate the sword pointed up. (V. high).
  • Host - 1. Catholic cult object. Metal box in which non -consecrated hosts are stored. They can be painted round and flat with which a small cross is inserted.
  • king of arms - 1. Position at the service of the Sovereign King, his mission consisted in past times, be a bearer of the declaration of war and publish La Paz, prepare the arms shields according to the rules of the Blazon whether they are family or municipalities. Dress
  • Ladies, shield - 1. The shield of the ladies or ladies is usually in the form of Losanje, some instead of using those of their lineage, use their husbands. In some married ladies shields, there are half of the husband's weapons to the right hand and half of those that L
  • manor - 1. Territory subject to the domain of the Lord or the lady and equal to the administration of one of them.
  • Orders - 1. Term used to designate the number of pieces, equal belts repeating with alternateness between metal and color.
  • Quoted - 1. Narrow or decreased first -degree band, reduced to half of its width, some heraldists are from the opinion, which has to be the third part to the band or 1/9 of the width of the blazon. Diminished honorable piece.
  • Raising - 1. It is said of a piece or part of a piece that is placed at a higher height from which it corresponds, especially the girdle or the cabrio.
  • shade - 1. It is the figure or shadow that gives a figure by very dim passion in which the field of the shield is seen, it usually applies to the sun or the lion.
  • Skip - 1. Piece covered with scales such as fish or siren, usually of different enamel.
  • Speakers, weapons - 1. They are those represented by a figure, which refers and designates the surname of the lineage they represent and graphically interprets the last name.
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.
  • Venus - 1. Sinople color in the assemblies of the sovereigns. 2. Female mythological figure, represented by a young naked woman with long hair. According to some heraldists, it must be represented dressed.
  • wheel - 1. It is represented in a circular and radios. Symbolism: strength.