The surname Beuly: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Beuly, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Beuly. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Beuly belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Beuly surname.

The heraldry of Beuly, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Beuly in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Beuly, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Beuly for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Beuly

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Beuly surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Beuly surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Beuly surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Beuly surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Beuly.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Beuly

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Beuly surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Beuly coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Beuly heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Beuly coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Band Head - 1. It is the result of the union of the boss and the band.
  • Biped - 1. It is said of the piece, especially the cross, with the lower arm fork in the direction of the angles of the tip, forming a chevron. Identifying sign of the Picapedreros of the Middle Ages.
  • Capelo - 1. Timbre used in ecclesiastical heraldry. Gulls lined, with fifteen tassels pending cords placed in pyramidal form used by cardinals. Of sinople with ten tassels for the archbishops and with six of the same color for the bishops,
  • Cruz de Avis - 1. Cruz Flordelisada de sinople, adopted by the Portuguese order of Avis.
  • Cutted piece - 1. These pieces originated to distinguish weapons using as a brisury to differentiate the main weapons of the second. In other assemblies the cuts are used to defame the weapons of the person who has committed a crime so
  • Cypress - 1. Tree that is painted with the straight trunk and conical cup finished in tip.
  • Flambante - 1. Palos, belts and wave bands that finish on the tip are understood as if they were flames. It derives from the Latin voice "Flamula", by the flame, however, our heralds want flambantes view of the French voice "flamb". (V. Flameante
  • Furious - 1. It is said of the bull, cow or another quadruped animal in rampant attitude, raised by its hind legs. (V. agitated).
  • JIRONADA CRUZ - 1. It is said of the cross in which in its center four girons of each arm of alternate colors converge.
  • Mantle - 1. Piece consisting of a pearl that has the upper part of the boss full, without seeing the field of the shield. 2. Scarlet is painted, lined with armiños and low from the crown that finishes it, knotting with laces of tassels that form two bullones a
  • Orders - 1. Term used to designate the number of pieces, equal belts repeating with alternateness between metal and color.
  • Put together a shield - 1. Compose a blazon with all precise elements, loads, accompaniments, external and internal ornaments, according to the heraldry rules.
  • Sayo - 1. Wide and long jacket. In the Middle Ages the nobles, they carried it under the armor. It was made of wool, leather and iron meshes. The mesh level comes from it.
  • Snake - 1. It is represented in the shield in a stick and wave situation.
  • Speakers, weapons - 1. They are those represented by a figure, which refers and designates the surname of the lineage they represent and graphically interprets the last name.
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.