The surname Beyret: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Beyret, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Beyret. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Beyret belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Beyret surname.

The heraldry of Beyret, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Beyret in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Beyret, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Beyret for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Beyret

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Beyret surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Beyret surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Beyret surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Beyret surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Beyret.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Beyret

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Beyret surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Beyret coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Beyret heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Beyret coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Bordure - 1. Piece that surrounds the field of the shield inside has the sixth part of it. It can adopt varied shapes such as the composed embroidery, denticulate bordura, pie
  • Camba - 1. Said by some authors to the wheels of the cars.
  • Cantado - 1. When a main piece is accompanied by another in the cantons of the shield. Generally the Cross or the Sotuer accompanied by four pieces or figures arranged in the flanks between the arms 2. It is said of four figures or furniture placed in the four
  • Contoured - 1. Figure that in its contour is profiled of different enamel. (V. Contorn, profiled).
  • Crown of the Infantes de Castilla - 1. Like the real one, but without headband.
  • Cruz Pate - 1. Cruz widened at all its ends and called with this definition by the French heraldists and adopted with this name by the Spaniards. (See kick).
  • Drag - 1. It is said of the piece that is stuck or trimmed inside.
  • Elm - 1. This tree is represented elongated. Symbolism: Dignity.
  • Embroidered - 1. It is said of every piece that has the edge of different enamel. It is synonymous with fillet. Used at crosses, bands, confalones, chevrones, and the and themes. etc., that have the edges of different enamel and that is regularly a fillet of the sixth
  • Fifth girdle - 1. term used by Spanish heraldist, equivalent to quinquefolia. (V. Quinquefolio)
  • High faith - 1. Ancient authors used this phrase to designate the sword pointed up. (V. high).
  • Open - 1. The windows and doors of castles, towers or other figures when through them the field of the shield or the enamel of the piece they had below is seen. The rustters, macles and stars or rosettes that the spurs carry, as it is
  • Orange - 1. One of the colors of English heraldry. When drawing it in black and white, it is represented by diagonal lines that go from the sinister barren canton of the boss, to the right hand of the tip, crossed by horizontal lines, filling the entire field of t
  • Orange tree - 1. Tree that is represented with branches, open and fruity cup.
  • Quartered - 1. Term used by some old heraldists to define the quarter. (V. Quarter).
  • Sacred Ceremonies Figures - 1. Báculos, candelers, candles, bells, custodians, copones, reliquaries and rosaries, their enamel and situation in the shield must be indicated.
  • Shyan - 1. Term used to designate animals that lack the tongue, nails, tail. 2. It is said of white weapons with the broken tip, whose imperfections in the figures and pieces are a punishment note. 3. Said of the shield in which they have been removed
  • Skip - 1. Piece covered with scales such as fish or siren, usually of different enamel.
  • torn - 1. It is said of the cross whose arms in turn consist of two sticks each, which if it comes to tear or open the main ones.
  • Tortoise - 1. This animal is represented showing out of the shell, head, legs and tail. This emblem is a heraldry relic of the Crusades. Perhaps to mean the slow effort, but constant in the struggle to impose Christianity. According to some
  • trace - 1. Name that some Italian traders give to Lambel. (V. Lambel).
  • Trophy - 1. Set of military weapons and badges grouped with some symmetry, such as bullets, cannons, rifles, grenades, picas, drums, etc.