The surname Beysenova: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Beysenova, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Beysenova. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Beysenova belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Beysenova surname.

The heraldry of Beysenova, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Beysenova in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Beysenova, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Beysenova for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Beysenova

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Beysenova surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Beysenova surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Beysenova surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Beysenova surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Beysenova.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Beysenova

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Beysenova surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Beysenova coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Beysenova heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Beysenova coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Artificial - 1. Figure that is not considered normal. (V. Artificial figures).
  • Band Head - 1. It is the result of the union of the boss and the band.
  • Bordure - 1. Piece that surrounds the field of the shield inside has the sixth part of it. It can adopt varied shapes such as the composed embroidery, denticulate bordura, pie
  • Crossed - 1. Apply to the pieces that carry an overlapping cross. 2. It is said of the gentleman that enlisted for some crusade. 3. It is said of any figure that at its upper end is added a cross, usually the globe and flags.
  • Figure - 1. term used in Spanish heraldry to define the objects or loads that adorn the coat of arms. They can be distinguished in natural forms: animals, vegetables, human beings with their members or part of them, elements such as earth, water, fire
  • Full weapons - 1. To those of the head of the family without any modification or addition and that they can also carry the heir of the family, but not the second children who were forced to introduce any difference, revealing that they were not the head of
  • Jironado in Cruz - 1. It is said of the shield formed by jirones movement of the boss, the tip and the flanks that converge in the center. Also known as ancient jironado.
  • Major triangle - 1. Term used by some old heraldists when describing the provision of any piece in two and one, or ordered. (See well ordered, two and one, triangle).
  • Ortiga blade - 1. SHEET IN ENDENTED FORM, BELONGING TO THE ORTIGAS PLANT. Figure used in German heraldry.
  • Punta and fallen - 1. Curvilíneo triangle that has its vertex in the lower third of the shield and its base in the lower part of it.
  • Stribted bridge - 1. The one who carries triangular pieces to sustain the vaults.
  • Tortoise - 1. This animal is represented showing out of the shell, head, legs and tail. This emblem is a heraldry relic of the Crusades. Perhaps to mean the slow effort, but constant in the struggle to impose Christianity. According to some
  • Tripled cross - 1. Cruz formed by three horizontal crossbars that cross the vertical or central crossbar. Similar to papal.
  • Vívora - 1. Snake. It is represented, put in stick and waved or only showing neck and head out of a boiler, in its handles or in vases, copones or finishing a cross or other pieces, then they are called in the heraldic language gringolate. Sum