The surname Codecasa: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Codecasa, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Codecasa. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Codecasa belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Codecasa surname.

The heraldry of Codecasa, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Codecasa in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Codecasa, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Codecasa for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Codecasa

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Codecasa surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Codecasa surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Codecasa surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Codecasa surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Codecasa.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Codecasa

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Codecasa surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Codecasa coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Codecasa heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Codecasa coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Cantado - 1. When a main piece is accompanied by another in the cantons of the shield. Generally the Cross or the Sotuer accompanied by four pieces or figures arranged in the flanks between the arms 2. It is said of four figures or furniture placed in the four
  • distributions - 1. They are the subdivisions that occur in the headquarters of the shield, being the result of dividing it into more than one partition of the existing one.
  • Fig tree sheet - 1. It is represented in a lanceolate form with three leaves added to the rib. It is usually painted as sinople.
  • Friendship - 1. Said for some to the Hand Alliance, Faith, Linked Hands. (V. Hand Alliance).
  • Narrow - 1. It is said of the cross diminished to half of its width adapts to the accompanying furniture and figures. Diminished honorable piece.
  • Pampolate - 1. Enamel with which the leaves of a vineyard are painted.
  • Sacred Ceremonies Figures - 1. Báculos, candelers, candles, bells, custodians, copones, reliquaries and rosaries, their enamel and situation in the shield must be indicated.
  • Santa Catalina wheel. - 1. Symbolic wheel of the martyrdom of Santa Catalina. It consists of wheel inserted with metal blades, to be torment. It is presented in front.
  • Shield - 1. School and ministry of the squire.
  • Snake - 1. It is represented in the shield in a stick and wave situation.
  • Surmotado chief - 1. The boss whose upper third is of enamel different from the field of the shield and the boss.
  • To - 1. Name that refers to the wings of any kind of bird. Indicate in the position that is represented. They are usually always drawing at the head of the shield, otherwise their position must be indicated. (V. flight).
  • TRIDES CRUZ - 1. It is the cross formed by a trident.
  • Vain - 1. Terms used in some ancient nobles to describe the piece or vacuum or empty figure inside letting the shield field see. (V. empty, bucked, hollow, empty, empty, vain.).
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.