The surname Coertjens: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Coertjens, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Coertjens. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Coertjens belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Coertjens surname.

The heraldry of Coertjens, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Coertjens in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Coertjens, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Coertjens for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Coertjens

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Coertjens surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Coertjens surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Coertjens surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Coertjens surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Coertjens.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Coertjens

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Coertjens surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Coertjens coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Coertjens heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Coertjens coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancorada Cruz - 1. Cross in which their ends separate and end in the form of anchor.
  • Curvilineo footwear - 1. It is said of the shield divided by two curved diagonals that leave the chief angles, being at the tip of the shield.
  • Foreign - 1. When a coat of arms is not subject to the rules of the Blazon. 2. It is said of false weapons.
  • gonfalon - 1. Minor banner. Used from the Middle Ages by some European states to the present day. Its design is variable although generally two or three three rounded or tip ends stand out.
  • Heraldry - 1. HERALDO POSITION. 2. Name given to the ceremony that was made to baptize the Heralds, an act in which the king emptied a glass of wine on the head of the applicant.
  • Knotty - 1. Said by some to the trunk of the trees and other heraldic figures. 2. cited by some authors to the contradiction and off. (V. Contradesbrancado, off).
  • Noble attributes. - 1. This group corresponds to the crowns, helmets, top, lambrequins, mantles, veneras. Particular heraldry signs to determine the quality of the individual who uses them. They are not hereditary and reflect the personality of those who use them. It is not
  • Nurido - 1. The plants and flowers that are not represented with the lower part of the trunk. 2. It is said of the lis flower that the lower part is missing.
  • Royal Crown of Portugal - 1. Similar to the Spanish Royal Crown. (See Spanish Royal Corona).
  • rudder wheel - 1. Naval rig. Radied wheel with whip. It will be represented in front. (V. rudder).
  • Spider - 1. This insect is represented in front of profile or back, on your fabric or without it.
  • Tooth - 1. Mill or tooth wheel, usually enamel of silver or gold. 2. According to some term equivalent to the Lunnel. (V. Lunel). 3. Human dental teeth are usually painted to the natural with their roots, indicate the amount and position.
  • Triumphal crown - 1. With bay leaves. Victory symbol. Army generals were granted that they had won in some important battle defeating the enemy.
  • Vervesor, Valvasor, VarVassor - 1. Terms used in some 16th -century Catalan manuscripts in Catalonia. In the feudal era vasallo of another vassal. 2. It also applied to a vassal that had a lower range. In Catalonia they were the last category of their own feudal lords
  • virgin - 1. Iconographic image of the symbolized Catholic Church as the mother of Jesus Christ. It is represented naturally, and sometimes with crescent or a servant at your feet with an apple in the mouth.
  • Wiring - 1. It is said of the cross whose sticks have a salomonic or braided shape.