The surname Coignet: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Coignet, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Coignet. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Coignet belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Coignet surname.

The heraldry of Coignet, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Coignet in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Coignet, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Coignet for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Coignet

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Coignet surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Coignet surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Coignet surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Coignet surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Coignet.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Coignet

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Coignet surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Coignet coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Coignet heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Coignet coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ampisher - 1. Winged snake with a second head in the tail. It is framed in the group of fantastic animals.
  • Bar - 1. Piece that diagonally crosses the shield from the left angle superior to the lower right angle. Honorable or first order piece. Its width must occupy a third of the shield. The bars if your number exceeds the four are called Li
  • Cartela lying down - 1. Cartela to which contrary to its natural position is in horizontal position.
  • displaced - 1. term used to designate the piece whose length half of which moves to the right -handed side, sinister towards the boss or the tip of the shield. You only maintain contact with the other half by a point as well as the girdle. If the separation line
  • Flanked - 1. It is said of the shield when divided into three equal parts delimited by two vertical, angled lines, curves of a 1/5 width of the shield. Almost non -existent in Spanish heraldry. 2. Figure that starting from the flanks of the shield by half
  • Home of paratge - 1. Hidalgo de Cataluña. Equivalent to the Hidalgo de Castilla and the Infanzón in Aragon
  • Janus - 1. One of the ancient gods of Rome. He is represented with two opposite faces, one that looks at the future or the West, and the other that looks at the past or east. To him is due to the name of the month of January (janarius), month consecrated to Jano.
  • Leopard - 1. It is represented in an intern posture with the head straight, showing the two eyes with the tail arched out. If this is raised, it is called a grimid or rampant. Like the lions if they are in number of two, one front is placed
  • Nailed - 1. It is said of the piece, whose nails are of different enamel than the main figure.
  • Napoleonic cap - 1. The Emperor Napoleon, replaced the crown of the nobility to which he established different caps designs, always furrowed with feathers whose number indicated the dignity of the one who was possessed.
  • Oak - 1. Tree that is represented with bone trunk and tortuous branches. Everything is usually presented with sinople, natural, engaged. Symbol of solidity, strength, virtue and resistance. The medieval heraldic oak is represented with trunk and four cross bran
  • Pennant - 1. Thin and long ending cloth strip and usually triangularly.
  • Santiago, Cruz de - 1. Sword -shaped gules color. Symbol of the Order of Santiago de la Espada, instituted in 1175. It was initially known by the Order of the Frailes of Cáceres.
  • stapes - 1. Your heraldry drawing does not have a fixed design although straight lines are generally avoided.
  • Tilo, leaves - 1. The lock leaves are represented as sinople or silver. Figure widely used in Germanic and French heraldry.
  • Tripled cross - 1. Cruz formed by three horizontal crossbars that cross the vertical or central crossbar. Similar to papal.
  • Vídamo - 1. Ecclesiastical lawyer appointed by the King of France, who subsequently passed to the lay man with the obligation to defend ecclesiastical goods.
  • Vulture - 1. This animal is represented in profile or put in front, looking at the right or left of the shield.