The surname Colago: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colago, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colago. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colago belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colago surname.

The heraldry of Colago, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colago in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colago, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colago for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colago

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colago surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colago surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colago surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colago surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colago.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colago

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colago surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colago coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colago heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colago coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Adommed - 1. When one piece is loaded with another. Disused term. (V. adorned).
  • Cherub - 1. Only the head of an angel with two wings is usually drawn, with gold hair and wings can be enameled gold or silver with a face of carnation, but it should indicate the enamel in which it is painted. 2. External ornament of the shield. (V. Angelote).
  • Cruz-Chevronada - 1. Term used to designate the Union of the Cross and the Chevron.
  • curtaining - 1. Trochado shield which has been trunk again in some of its divisions. 2. It is said of the Potented Cross that without reaching the edges of the shield, the angles of the Potenzas have trimmed. 2. Also of any animal member or P
  • Lazarista - 1. Order of Knights instituted in the holy places, whose purpose was to attend the lepers. His badge was an eight -pointed cross, as a star, sinople. 2. Knight belonging to said order.
  • Livery - 1. Library can be honor, ceremony and service. The former were and are used by the sovereigns, the great lords, military and gentlemen of the orders. The second for the kings of weapons, heralds, pharaute, persevering, ride
  • manor - 1. Territory subject to the domain of the Lord or the lady and equal to the administration of one of them.
  • Orange tree - 1. Tree that is represented with branches, open and fruity cup.
  • Oval shield - 1. Common to all the armories, especially the Italian. (V. Shields).
  • Paper - 1. Union of several semicircles that cover the field of the shield forming a mesh, the bulk is equal to that of the fillet. These semicircles are placed in the girdle imitating the scales of a fish. Only the edge of the scales is the blocked that can be e
  • Rampante Leon - 1. The rampant lion is the most used figure in the Spanish heraldry, and to a lesser extent in the European, its position is the one lifted on its hind rooms with the front claws in an attack position. (See rampant).
  • Royal Crown of Spain - 1. It is formed by a circle of gold enriched with precious stones that support eight flowers, celery leaves, interspersed with one pearl, raised, holding eight headbands loaded with pearls, closed on top and in their union a globe and a
  • See you in stick - 1. Said of seeing you put in a stick situation.
  • Shield - 1. According to July of Atienza in its dictionary it reflects this term, it could be a scude. (V. Escudete).
  • Skip - 1. Piece covered with scales such as fish or siren, usually of different enamel.
  • Smuggled - 1. It is said of the cut and flock shield in turn, so that the boss's bands are opposed to those of the other enamel, located on the tip.
  • Sotuer waved - 1. It is said of the Sotuer that adopts a formed by waved reliefs
  • Tudesco canton - 1. Term used by some ancient European armorialists, in fact it is a jironed canton. (V. Jirón).
  • Turtledove - 1. Ave. It is represented with folded wings. It symbolizes as well as dove marital fidelity. (V. Paloma).
  • unscathed - 1. It is said of all that animal that does not carry any garrison.