The surname Colaw: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colaw, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colaw. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colaw belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colaw surname.

The heraldry of Colaw, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colaw in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colaw, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colaw for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colaw

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colaw surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colaw surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colaw surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colaw surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colaw.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colaw

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colaw surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colaw coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colaw heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colaw coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Bomb - 1. This figure is normally represented in the form of a ball and that a flame comes out.
  • Cabo de Armería - 1. It is said of the main relative, head of his lineage in Navarra. Also called Palacio Cabo. (V. Cabo de Armería).
  • Capelo - 1. Timbre used in ecclesiastical heraldry. Gulls lined, with fifteen tassels pending cords placed in pyramidal form used by cardinals. Of sinople with ten tassels for the archbishops and with six of the same color for the bishops,
  • Cave - 1. It is represented in irregular semicircle loaded on a mountain, of different enamel.
  • distributions - 1. They are the subdivisions that occur in the headquarters of the shield, being the result of dividing it into more than one partition of the existing one.
  • Embroidered - 1. It is said of every piece that has the edge of different enamel. It is synonymous with fillet. Used at crosses, bands, confalones, chevrones, and the and themes. etc., that have the edges of different enamel and that is regularly a fillet of the sixth
  • Family shield - 1. They are formed by the barracks or barracks exclusively to the first last name.
  • Farm in bar - 1. It is said of the shield divided into three equal parts by lines that go from the sinister canton of the boss to the right hand of the beard or tip of the shield.
  • Flordelisado foot, cross of - 1. It is said of the cross whose foot ends in the form of a flower of lis.
  • Human figures - 1. They include heads, eye, nose, mouth, ear, bust, shoulder, arm, open hand, fist, linked hands, breasts, whole body, leg, foot, heart, etc. Generally they should not be introduced into the blazons whole human figures but only member
  • Lynx - 1. The lynx that usually appears in the blazons does not present the fur stained with dark moles, such as the one known in Spain, but similar to the African, of uniform leonia layer and a little larger than the European. Sight symbol and by definition D
  • Oak - 1. Tree that is represented with bone trunk and tortuous branches. Everything is usually presented with sinople, natural, engaged. Symbol of solidity, strength, virtue and resistance. The medieval heraldic oak is represented with trunk and four cross bran
  • Oval dress - (V. Dress).
  • Priestly crown - 1. Several subjects were made, mainly olive tree and spikes.
  • Rodete - 1. Braid or cord that surrounds the upper part of the helmet. (V. Bureaule).
  • See you on tip - 1. Said of the seeing that the tips are placed in opposition with the bases of other see you, that is, so that the tip of the silver Vero, is next to the base of the same metal in the upper row and that of Azur will also find in the same situation
  • Shield - 1. School and ministry of the squire.
  • Venablo - 1. SHORT AND LAND DARDO OR LAND Consisting of a thin and cylindrical rod finished on an iron leaf in the alveolate shape. In the sixteenth century in Spain, it was the distinctive of Alferez. (V. arrow, spear).