The surname Colbenson: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colbenson, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colbenson. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colbenson belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colbenson surname.

The heraldry of Colbenson, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colbenson in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colbenson, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colbenson for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colbenson

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colbenson surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colbenson surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colbenson surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colbenson surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colbenson.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colbenson

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colbenson surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colbenson coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colbenson heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colbenson coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancient - 1. It is said of the crown with pyramidal rays, in which the lions are usually crowning. It can also appear alone. The busts of kings or princes can be crowned to the old one, according to some European assemblies.
  • Barbican - 1. Saetera or tronera in castles or strengths.
  • Bollones - 1. Said of the nails of different enamel than the piece or armor that carries them.
  • Bordure - 1. Piece that surrounds the field of the shield inside has the sixth part of it. It can adopt varied shapes such as the composed embroidery, denticulate bordura, pie
  • Brazier - 1. Domestic utensil used to give heat to the feet in the rooms. It is usually represented with fiery or flaming embers.
  • Cart - 1. Long and low with two wheels. It is painted in profile with the colors indicated.
  • Explained - (V. Expaste).
  • Montesa, order of - 1. Substitute military order of that of the Temple, created in 1317. Its badge, Modern Montesa Cruz, is equal to that of its congeners of Alcantara and Calatrava, of Saber, with a flat cross of gules loading it.
  • Nailed - 1. It is said of the piece, whose nails are of different enamel than the main figure.
  • Noble genealogy - 1. History and research of families in their origins whose weapons appear or have the right to appear in the books called Blassonarians, noble, armorials.
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Plow - 1. Labranza Apero. It is represented looking at the right hand of the shield.
  • Profile cross - 1. Cross in which it carries a steak around it of different enamel than the figure.
  • Quartered - 1. Term used by some old heraldists to define the quarter. (V. Quarter).
  • Rooster - 1. Ave. Its regular position is the profile, it is said created or barbelled. It is also said singer, when drawing with an open beak, and daring if he lifts the right leg.
  • Semibanda-Faja - 1. Heraldry composition composed of the union of the upper half of the band and the girdle.
  • Skip - 1. Piece covered with scales such as fish or siren, usually of different enamel.
  • Surmotado chief - 1. The boss whose upper third is of enamel different from the field of the shield and the boss.
  • Vain - 1. Terms used in some ancient nobles to describe the piece or vacuum or empty figure inside letting the shield field see. (V. empty, bucked, hollow, empty, empty, vain.).
  • Winged Leon - 1. Chimerical figure. It is represented with extended wings.