The surname Colbrant: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colbrant, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colbrant. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colbrant belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colbrant surname.

The heraldry of Colbrant, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colbrant in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colbrant, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colbrant for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colbrant

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colbrant surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colbrant surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colbrant surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colbrant surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colbrant.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colbrant

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colbrant surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colbrant coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colbrant heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colbrant coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Badly cut - 1. Indicates the sleeves of a dress when they are not represented complete. Very old figure of European armor.
  • Biped - 1. It is said of the piece, especially the cross, with the lower arm fork in the direction of the angles of the tip, forming a chevron. Identifying sign of the Picapedreros of the Middle Ages.
  • Bound - 1. The pieces or figures tied by a tape or cord. 2. Term that is designated to the hawk or bird of prey that carries its legs tied by a cord. (V. Liadas, liado).
  • Carapeteiro - 1. Genuine tree of the Portuguese heraldry which carries seven arms. Its use is purely heraldic. (V. CREQUIL).
  • Chief-Sotuer - 1. Piece that consists of the boss and the Sotuer.
  • Composed bordura from Castilla y León - 1. Said by some authors to the bordura made up and alternate with a lion and a castle, symbols of the kingdoms of Castilla y León.
  • Cordada - 1. When a musical instrument carries strings being of different metal it is said cord. 2. Also said of the stunned arc string.
  • Denmark crown - 1. Similar to that of Sweden, but surmontada of a tremboling cross.
  • dextropiro, destrocero, dextrocero - 1. Terms used to designate the entire human arm, always showing the elbow. Movie of the right -hand flank, dressed, naked or armed.
  • Flambante - 1. Palos, belts and wave bands that finish on the tip are understood as if they were flames. It derives from the Latin voice "Flamula", by the flame, however, our heralds want flambantes view of the French voice "flamb". (V. Flameante
  • Hammer - 1. It is represented in heraldry with the right hand and the handle put into stick, looking at the tip.
  • Heraldry - 1. HERALDO POSITION. 2. Name given to the ceremony that was made to baptize the Heralds, an act in which the king emptied a glass of wine on the head of the applicant.
  • Horseshoe - 1. It must be represented with seven nails or holes. Normally the tips of the horseshoe get towards the tip., If it should indicate. Symbolizes: protection.
  • Lattice - 1. It is said of the frozen shield, when the site intersection points are stuck from a different enamel. (V. Collected).
  • Lynx - 1. The lynx that usually appears in the blazons does not present the fur stained with dark moles, such as the one known in Spain, but similar to the African, of uniform leonia layer and a little larger than the European. Sight symbol and by definition D
  • mirror - 1. Figure that is represented in various shapes and oval design, square, round, with mango, the contour or gold frame is usually enamel and the same, the center of the silver mirror.
  • Montesa, order of - 1. Substitute military order of that of the Temple, created in 1317. Its badge, Modern Montesa Cruz, is equal to that of its congeners of Alcantara and Calatrava, of Saber, with a flat cross of gules loading it.
  • Noble attributes. - 1. This group corresponds to the crowns, helmets, top, lambrequins, mantles, veneras. Particular heraldry signs to determine the quality of the individual who uses them. They are not hereditary and reflect the personality of those who use them. It is not
  • torn - 1. It is said of the cross whose arms in turn consist of two sticks each, which if it comes to tear or open the main ones.
  • Venus - 1. Sinople color in the assemblies of the sovereigns. 2. Female mythological figure, represented by a young naked woman with long hair. According to some heraldists, it must be represented dressed.