The surname Colemen: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colemen, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colemen. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colemen belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colemen surname.

The heraldry of Colemen, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colemen in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colemen, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colemen for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colemen

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colemen surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colemen surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colemen surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colemen surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colemen.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colemen

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colemen surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colemen coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colemen heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colemen coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Band-band - 1. Piece that is the result of the union of the band and the foot.
  • Bifurcado foot, cross of - 1. It is said of the cross whose foot is cracked divided into two halves. (V. Bifurcado standing cross).
  • Canary - 1. Ave. is normally represented with gold, chopped or shown with the colors and enamels that are natural.
  • Chained - 1. Said of a person or animal is tied with a chain of a given enamel. If they are animals such as lions, bears, lebre them, etc., the enamel will be indicated as long as it is not iron (saber).
  • Crenellated to gibelin. - 1. Type of encouragement with the aged battlements, typical of the Italian medieval heraldry and widely used in Catalonia.
  • Crown of Prince of Asturias - 1. Equal to the Real of Spain, but with four headbands. It belongs to the heir of the crown of Spain.
  • diademada - 1. It is understood as the person or any other religious figure or not to carry a circle around the head such as the Imperial Eagles and the Lion of Venice. (V. Nimbo).
  • gules - 1. Heraldic name of the red color. It is represented graphically by vertical lines. Symbol: Value, strength and intrepidity and faith of the martyrs. 2. It exists in the French and German armories of the fourteent
  • Humiliated - 1. It is said of the piece below or under another.
  • Jerusalem, Cruz - 1. Potented crosses that carry four crosses in the holes of their arms, which can be simple or also potent.
  • Lattice - 1. It is said of the frozen shield, when the site intersection points are stuck from a different enamel. (V. Collected).
  • Lesonjes - 1. Term used by some 18th century heraldists to describe Losanje or Losanjeado.
  • Line - 1. Its thickness is the eighth part of the Orla to the distinction of the fillet that has a quarter. It can be represented in a girdle, band, cross, orla. It symbolizes bastardía. (V. fillet).
  • shouted out - 1. It applies to any animal that is arrested or taken between ties or networks.
  • snake - 1. Snake represented undulating, noda or biting your tail. (V. undulating, nuda).
  • Terrace - 1. Figure that represents the ground and in which other figures are placed, it is located at the tip of the shield, they are usually painted in sinople or natural. Occupies the beard or campaign of the shield as a land and usually resembles an irregula mo