The surname Emaides: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emaides, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emaides. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emaides belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emaides surname.

The heraldry of Emaides, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emaides in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emaides, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emaides for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emaides

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emaides surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emaides surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emaides surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emaides surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emaides.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emaides

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emaides surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emaides coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emaides heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emaides coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Adommed - 1. When one piece is loaded with another. Disused term. (V. adorned).
  • Alternate Bordura - 1. Said by some authors to the bordura through which different pieces or figures are happening one behind the other along the bordura.
  • Ancorada - 1. It is said of a cross, of a Sotuer and, in general of any piece, whose limbs end up in the way of the anchors. (V. anchored).
  • Cabriado - 1. It is said of the shield or the curd of metal and color goats alternately. (V. Chevronado).
  • Full weapons - 1. To those of the head of the family without any modification or addition and that they can also carry the heir of the family, but not the second children who were forced to introduce any difference, revealing that they were not the head of
  • Genealogist - 1. It is said that the study of genealogies and lineages does profession.
  • Hawk - 1. Ave. painted and looking next to the right side.
  • iron rose - 1. null as a piece in Spanish heraldry, but existing in the French armor. It is constituted by an iron cross circulated and singed with four flowers converging in the tip to the sides of the cross.
  • Line - 1. Its thickness is the eighth part of the Orla to the distinction of the fillet that has a quarter. It can be represented in a girdle, band, cross, orla. It symbolizes bastardía. (V. fillet).
  • Mantle - 1. Piece consisting of a pearl that has the upper part of the boss full, without seeing the field of the shield. 2. Scarlet is painted, lined with armiños and low from the crown that finishes it, knotting with laces of tassels that form two bullones a
  • Nurido - 1. The plants and flowers that are not represented with the lower part of the trunk. 2. It is said of the lis flower that the lower part is missing.
  • Nut - 1. The fruit of walnut is represented in a natural or sinople ovoid form.
  • Orchylar - 1. It is said of the piece presented in a fork form. As the León tail, which is sometimes divided into two.
  • Potented Cross - 1. Cross in which all its extremes end up in Potenzas. (V. potentiated). Also called Tao of the Hebrews.
  • Royal Crown of Portugal - 1. Similar to the Spanish Royal Crown. (See Spanish Royal Corona).
  • Spoon - 1. Domestic utensil and heraldry figure represented by a handle and a concave blade.
  • Triumphal crown - 1. With bay leaves. Victory symbol. Army generals were granted that they had won in some important battle defeating the enemy.
  • wreath - 1. Ornamental figure formed with flowers, herbs, intertwined or united with tapes. In heraldry there are various kinds of them.