The surname Emars: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emars, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emars. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emars belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emars surname.

The heraldry of Emars, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emars in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emars, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emars for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emars

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emars surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emars surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emars surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emars surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emars.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emars

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emars surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emars coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emars heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emars coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Ancorada Cruz Bifida - 1. It is said of the cross whose head is divided into two acute points one towards the right hand and the other towards the sinister and the ringing. It is inverted.
  • boss over - (V. Surmonted Chief).
  • COLERO - 1. Term used by some ancient authors to define the lion who hides the tail. (V. cowardly).
  • compensated - 1. It is said of any piece or figure that carries as garrison a fillet, except at one of its ends.
  • Counterbretes - 1. Row of notches of different enamels on the same girdle, stick, band or bar, do not match each other. (See counterbirt, crenellated).
  • Dalmatic - 1. Wide robe, open on the sides used by the kings of weapons in which those of their sovereigns were embroidered.
  • displaced - 1. term used to designate the piece whose length half of which moves to the right -handed side, sinister towards the boss or the tip of the shield. You only maintain contact with the other half by a point as well as the girdle. If the separation line
  • Double counter -alleged - 1. Said by some authors to the piece doubly encouraged on both sides, but their openings do not coincide, that is, they are alternated from one side with the other. (V. counterbrown).
  • dragon - 1. The lion is generally applied to every animal whose part of the body ends in dragon especially the tail.
  • mirror - 1. Figure that is represented in various shapes and oval design, square, round, with mango, the contour or gold frame is usually enamel and the same, the center of the silver mirror.
  • Nailed - 1. It is said of the piece, whose nails are of different enamel than the main figure.
  • Natural figures - 1. They are used and employed from nature: stars, elements, human figures, quadrupeds, birds, insects, reptiles, trees, flowers, fruits, plants).
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Open - 1. The windows and doors of castles, towers or other figures when through them the field of the shield or the enamel of the piece they had below is seen. The rustters, macles and stars or rosettes that the spurs carry, as it is
  • Peacock - 1. Ave. is generally represented in front in a ruante position, with its open tail and looking at the right hand, its adorned head of three feathers in Penacho. It is also presented with profile with the crest of three sticks finished in a ball, and with
  • Pennant - 1. Thin and long ending cloth strip and usually triangularly.
  • Saber - 1. Name given to the black color used in heraldry, graphically represented by a vertical scratch and another horizontal forming a grid. There is a belief that blazons that carry this color are obliged to help those who have no
  • Shield - 1. According to July of Atienza in its dictionary it reflects this term, it could be a scude. (V. Escudete).
  • sunflower - 1. This plant is painted on a shield in front or profile with the turn, tilted and leafy. It is usually painted in gold or sinople.