The surname Emhoff: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emhoff, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emhoff. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emhoff belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emhoff surname.

The heraldry of Emhoff, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emhoff in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emhoff, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emhoff for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emhoff

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emhoff surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emhoff surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emhoff surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emhoff surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emhoff.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emhoff

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emhoff surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emhoff coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emhoff heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emhoff coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Belgium Crown - 1. Similar to the Spanish and that of Bavaria. (See Crown of Bavaria, Spanish Corona).
  • Bordura of Spain - 1. Term used by some authors to define the alternate edge of composses loaded with a lion and a castle, representing the weapons of Castilla y León.
  • Broken column - 1. A column, broken in two halves, represents the strength in heraldry.
  • Contrafilete - 1. It is said of the piece that wears two fillets. (V. fillet, threchor).
  • Cruz de Santa Tecla - 1. Tao cross. Adopted as emblem by some cathedrals. (V. Tao).
  • deployed - 1. Said of the eagle or any bird, which carries the wings deployed.
  • Flanked - 1. It is said of the shield when divided into three equal parts delimited by two vertical, angled lines, curves of a 1/5 width of the shield. Almost non -existent in Spanish heraldry. 2. Figure that starting from the flanks of the shield by half
  • Florerated - 1. Piece whose ends end in a flower, in general the lis or clover flower usually occurs, especially the girdle and the threchor and the cross.
  • Full weapons - 1. To those of the head of the family without any modification or addition and that they can also carry the heir of the family, but not the second children who were forced to introduce any difference, revealing that they were not the head of
  • Hawk - 1. Ave. painted and looking next to the right side.
  • Home of paratge - 1. Hidalgo de Cataluña. Equivalent to the Hidalgo de Castilla and the Infanzón in Aragon
  • Lazarista - 1. Order of Knights instituted in the holy places, whose purpose was to attend the lepers. His badge was an eight -pointed cross, as a star, sinople. 2. Knight belonging to said order.
  • Open - 1. The windows and doors of castles, towers or other figures when through them the field of the shield or the enamel of the piece they had below is seen. The rustters, macles and stars or rosettes that the spurs carry, as it is
  • Raising - 1. It is said of a piece or part of a piece that is placed at a higher height from which it corresponds, especially the girdle or the cabrio.
  • stapes - 1. Your heraldry drawing does not have a fixed design although straight lines are generally avoided.
  • Trophy - 1. Set of military weapons and badges grouped with some symmetry, such as bullets, cannons, rifles, grenades, picas, drums, etc.
  • Weapon chronicler - 1. Official position that a person holds through opposition, which is officially authorized by the Spanish State to extend certificates of weapons, generalogy, nobility with the requirements required by current legislation.
  • Wild pig - 1. The wild boar shows only one eye and one ear, ordinarily representing an intern, raised, furious of saber color, if the opposite is not indicated, with two large fangs that are its defenses.