The surname Emokpae: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emokpae, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emokpae. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emokpae belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emokpae surname.

The heraldry of Emokpae, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emokpae in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emokpae, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emokpae for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emokpae

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emokpae surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emokpae surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emokpae surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emokpae surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emokpae.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emokpae

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emokpae surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emokpae coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emokpae heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emokpae coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancorada Cruz - 1. Cross in which their ends separate and end in the form of anchor.
  • blood - 1. Red color. Erroneously used by some ancient authors when describing gules. (V. Gules).
  • Cabo de Armería - 1. It is said of the main relative, head of his lineage in Navarra. Also called Palacio Cabo. (V. Cabo de Armería).
  • Capelo - 1. Timbre used in ecclesiastical heraldry. Gulls lined, with fifteen tassels pending cords placed in pyramidal form used by cardinals. Of sinople with ten tassels for the archbishops and with six of the same color for the bishops,
  • Chained - 1. Said of a person or animal is tied with a chain of a given enamel. If they are animals such as lions, bears, lebre them, etc., the enamel will be indicated as long as it is not iron (saber).
  • Entrados - 1. The pieces and partitions of the shield that are nestled in the others in the form of a plug. (V. enado, nestled).
  • Footwear - 1. It is said of the shield divided by two diagonals that leave the chief angles, being at the tip of the shield.
  • Grill - 1. Utensil formed by a grid with mango. It is sometimes presented aside, but its most common position is the front. It is usually painted, although other colors and enamels are admitted.
  • Home of paratge - 1. Hidalgo de Cataluña. Equivalent to the Hidalgo de Castilla and the Infanzón in Aragon
  • Llana, Cruz - 1. It is said of the cross whose arms are without any highlight. (V. Cruz Llana).
  • Nailed - 1. It is said of the piece, whose nails are of different enamel than the main figure.
  • Patronato, weapons of - 1. They are the ones that distinguish a foundation or patrons of it, they can carry in memory of the institute.
  • retired - 1. When a moving piece of an edge of the shield, it only shows a part of its extension. 2. It is also said when two furniture or figures keep a distance backwards.
  • roeado - 1. Shield, piece or figure loaded with Roeles in number greater than nine.
  • Sayo - 1. Wide and long jacket. In the Middle Ages the nobles, they carried it under the armor. It was made of wool, leather and iron meshes. The mesh level comes from it.
  • Shield - 1. According to July of Atienza in its dictionary it reflects this term, it could be a scude. (V. Escudete).
  • Spider - 1. This insect is represented in front of profile or back, on your fabric or without it.
  • Surmotado chief - 1. The boss whose upper third is of enamel different from the field of the shield and the boss.