The surname Emonard: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emonard, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emonard. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emonard belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emonard surname.

The heraldry of Emonard, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emonard in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emonard, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emonard for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emonard

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emonard surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emonard surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emonard surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emonard surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emonard.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emonard

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emonard surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emonard coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emonard heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emonard coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Ancient - 1. It is said of the crown with pyramidal rays, in which the lions are usually crowning. It can also appear alone. The busts of kings or princes can be crowned to the old one, according to some European assemblies.
  • Back posts - 1. Term used by some authors to designate the figures that are turning their backs or opposites.
  • Balza - 1. banner or flag used by the Knights Templar. It is represented with the Templar cross in the center.
  • Belgium Crown - 1. Similar to the Spanish and that of Bavaria. (See Crown of Bavaria, Spanish Corona).
  • Carapeteiro - 1. Genuine tree of the Portuguese heraldry which carries seven arms. Its use is purely heraldic. (V. CREQUIL).
  • diademada - 1. It is understood as the person or any other religious figure or not to carry a circle around the head such as the Imperial Eagles and the Lion of Venice. (V. Nimbo).
  • In front of - 1. Term used to designate the human figure, put in this situation.
  • lagoon - 1. It is represented in a portion of irregular water surrounded by earth.
  • Lord - 1. Honorary title with which members of the high English nobility are distinguished.
  • LOSAGEADO - (V. LONSANJA).
  • miter - 1. properly ecclesiastical figure or headdress used by the Pope of Rome in the great religious ceremonies, bishops, abbots, represented with gold or silver, with the gold or silver ines.
  • Natural poster - 1. Cartela represented by means of a strip rolled at its ends.
  • Ondeada battery - 1. It is said of the battery that is formed by waves.
  • Paper - 1. Union of several semicircles that cover the field of the shield forming a mesh, the bulk is equal to that of the fillet. These semicircles are placed in the girdle imitating the scales of a fish. Only the edge of the scales is the blocked that can be e
  • Princess - 1. The infantas of Spain bring their shield in Losanje, with a crown of an infant, putting the full and non -split weapons, adorned with two green palms, such as the queens.
  • Ringed - 1. Piece whose arms are finished off with rings especially La Cruz and the Sotuer. 2. The sepulchral that has the rings or ring of an enamel different from the color of slab. (V. Clechado, rough-A).
  • Rooster - 1. Ave. Its regular position is the profile, it is said created or barbelled. It is also said singer, when drawing with an open beak, and daring if he lifts the right leg.
  • Saturn - 1. Sabble color name in real assemblies.
  • See you in stick - 1. Said of seeing you put in a stick situation.
  • Trunk - 1. It is said of the stick or broken piece in pieces, without losing the shape of your figure. (V. truncated).
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.