The surname Encinosa: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Encinosa, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Encinosa. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Encinosa belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Encinosa surname.

The heraldry of Encinosa, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Encinosa in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Encinosa, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Encinosa for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Encinosa

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Encinosa surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Encinosa surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Encinosa surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Encinosa surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Encinosa.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Encinosa

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Encinosa surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Encinosa coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Encinosa heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Encinosa coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Angleada - 1. Said by some authors to bands, bars, sticks, crosses, etc., whose edges are presented with a row of media circles united by the tips they look out. (V. Anglelada, Anglesada, Holding).
  • Barbaja - 1. piece that consists of the union of the girdle and the lower half of the bar
  • Chimeric, figures - (V. Chimeric figures).
  • Crossed - 1. Apply to the pieces that carry an overlapping cross. 2. It is said of the gentleman that enlisted for some crusade. 3. It is said of any figure that at its upper end is added a cross, usually the globe and flags.
  • Embraced - 1. term erroneously used by clutch. (V. Embradado). 2. Said by some authors of the animal that has the arms raised at the same time with the intention of hugging or relying although without touching.
  • Furious - 1. It is said of the bull, cow or another quadruped animal in rampant attitude, raised by its hind legs. (V. agitated).
  • opposite - 1. It is said of the cut shield whose division line is part two enameled triangles from one to the other. (V. from one to the other).
  • Pampolate - 1. Enamel with which the leaves of a vineyard are painted.
  • Pennant - 1. Thin and long ending cloth strip and usually triangularly.
  • Rampante Leon - 1. The rampant lion is the most used figure in the Spanish heraldry, and to a lesser extent in the European, its position is the one lifted on its hind rooms with the front claws in an attack position. (See rampant).
  • Ring - 1. Said of the animal, generally the buffalo, and according to some writer, the ox or the bull can also be included with the snout crossed by a ring.
  • Serperate - 1. It is said of the cross whose arms end in snakes.
  • Torrent - 1. Fast and irregular water course of low length whose course grows abruptly and violently. It is represented between two mountains or rocks, painted with azure and silver color. The abundance of things appears and symbolizes great concurrence of people o
  • Truncada, Cruz - 1. Cross formed by square rectangles separated from each other.