The surname Endersbe: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Endersbe, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Endersbe. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Endersbe belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Endersbe surname.

The heraldry of Endersbe, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Endersbe in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Endersbe, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Endersbe for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Endersbe

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Endersbe surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Endersbe surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Endersbe surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Endersbe surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Endersbe.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Endersbe

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Endersbe surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Endersbe coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Endersbe heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Endersbe coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Antlers - 1. When an animal is represented with its cornice that is its own, always with the most acute or terminal parts addressed to the boss.
  • Biped - 1. It is said of the piece, especially the cross, with the lower arm fork in the direction of the angles of the tip, forming a chevron. Identifying sign of the Picapedreros of the Middle Ages.
  • Dalmatic - 1. Wide robe, open on the sides used by the kings of weapons in which those of their sovereigns were embroidered.
  • Dress in Losanje - (V. Dress).
  • Fig tree sheet - 1. It is represented in a lanceolate form with three leaves added to the rib. It is usually painted as sinople.
  • Half flight down - 1. The tips of the half flight or wing must point in the direction of the shield.
  • Home of paratge - 1. Hidalgo de Cataluña. Equivalent to the Hidalgo de Castilla and the Infanzón in Aragon
  • Horseshoe - 1. It must be represented with seven nails or holes. Normally the tips of the horseshoe get towards the tip., If it should indicate. Symbolizes: protection.
  • Lazarista - 1. Order of Knights instituted in the holy places, whose purpose was to attend the lepers. His badge was an eight -pointed cross, as a star, sinople. 2. Knight belonging to said order.
  • mirror - 1. Figure that is represented in various shapes and oval design, square, round, with mango, the contour or gold frame is usually enamel and the same, the center of the silver mirror.
  • Nail - 1. Species of Maza that ends in oval or round -armed shape with aged tips. It will be placed vertically and the part destined to hurt looking towards the head of the shield.
  • Nebulated cane - 1. It is said of a cane formed in wave cloud, they can be put in band, bar, girdle and stick, etc. More than one are presented. They can also be one of one color and the other of different color.
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Quartered - 1. Term used by some old heraldists to define the quarter. (V. Quarter).
  • Rotea - 1. Term used by some Aragonese heraldists to fall to the cross of San Jorge.
  • See you in waves - 1. Said of the seeing that are represented forming waves.
  • Trunk - 1. It is said of the stick or broken piece in pieces, without losing the shape of your figure. (V. truncated).