The surname Endrizzi: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Endrizzi, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Endrizzi. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Endrizzi belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Endrizzi surname.

The heraldry of Endrizzi, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Endrizzi in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Endrizzi, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Endrizzi for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Endrizzi

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Endrizzi surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Endrizzi surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Endrizzi surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Endrizzi surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Endrizzi.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Endrizzi

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Endrizzi surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Endrizzi coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Endrizzi heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Endrizzi coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ampisher - 1. Winged snake with a second head in the tail. It is framed in the group of fantastic animals.
  • Bandy Band - 1. Band formed by Blacks. (V. countercharged).
  • Boss in chief - 1. Curvilíneo triangle that has its vertex in the center of the shield and its base at the top of it.
  • Chief-Sotuer - 1. Piece that consists of the boss and the Sotuer.
  • Counterbrown - 1. Row of notches of different enamels on the same girdle, stick, band or bar, do not match those above with the bottom (v. Contrabretes, counterless).
  • Embroidered - 1. It is said of every piece that has the edge of different enamel. It is synonymous with fillet. Used at crosses, bands, confalones, chevrones, and the and themes. etc., that have the edges of different enamel and that is regularly a fillet of the sixth
  • Explained - (V. Expaste).
  • Flambante - 1. Palos, belts and wave bands that finish on the tip are understood as if they were flames. It derives from the Latin voice "Flamula", by the flame, however, our heralds want flambantes view of the French voice "flamb". (V. Flameante
  • Fused. - 1. It applies to trees whose trunk and branches are of different enamel than their trunk. 2. When the spear, itch, flag, it carries the handle or support of a different enamel than its own.
  • GOED AGUILA - 1. Said of the eagle that is loaded with drops of blood. (V. dripped).
  • gonfalon - 1. Minor banner. Used from the Middle Ages by some European states to the present day. Its design is variable although generally two or three three rounded or tip ends stand out.
  • Hunting - 1. Term used by some authors, said by the animal that is represented in action to hunt.
  • Lynx - 1. The lynx that usually appears in the blazons does not present the fur stained with dark moles, such as the one known in Spain, but similar to the African, of uniform leonia layer and a little larger than the European. Sight symbol and by definition D
  • Montesa, order of - 1. Substitute military order of that of the Temple, created in 1317. Its badge, Modern Montesa Cruz, is equal to that of its congeners of Alcantara and Calatrava, of Saber, with a flat cross of gules loading it.
  • Parts of the shield - 1. It is the division of the shield, according to the human face represented in nine divisions and subdivisions: boss, tip, right -handed and sinister side.
  • Trophy - 1. Set of military weapons and badges grouped with some symmetry, such as bullets, cannons, rifles, grenades, picas, drums, etc.