The surname Fairbrace: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Fairbrace, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Fairbrace. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Fairbrace belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Fairbrace surname.

The heraldry of Fairbrace, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Fairbrace in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Fairbrace, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Fairbrace for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Fairbrace

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Fairbrace surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Fairbrace surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Fairbrace surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Fairbrace surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Fairbrace.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Fairbrace

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Fairbrace surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Fairbrace coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Fairbrace heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Fairbrace coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Badly cut - 1. Indicates the sleeves of a dress when they are not represented complete. Very old figure of European armor.
  • Cabin - 1. This construction is represented, headed with the roof of straw and the walls of trunks or stone. It paints its natural or silver and gold color.
  • defending - 1. Term used to designate the tabs and fangs of wild boar, when they are of different enamel than the rest of the body.
  • Drag - 1. It is said of the piece that is stuck or trimmed inside.
  • Heurtes - 1. Said by some authors to the Roeles de Azur. (V. Roel).
  • Lobbying - 1. Said of the eagle that is held with obstacles or wooden sticks. (See lock, work-o).
  • Major triangle - 1. Term used by some old heraldists when describing the provision of any piece in two and one, or ordered. (See well ordered, two and one, triangle).
  • Nail - 1. Species of Maza that ends in oval or round -armed shape with aged tips. It will be placed vertically and the part destined to hurt looking towards the head of the shield.
  • Paper - 1. Union of several semicircles that cover the field of the shield forming a mesh, the bulk is equal to that of the fillet. These semicircles are placed in the girdle imitating the scales of a fish. Only the edge of the scales is the blocked that can be e
  • pink - 1. It is said of the shield or figure sown of roses.
  • Spectrum - 1. Composite piece resulting from the boss's union and a stick that touches the right -handed flank. Used in Italian armor.
  • stopped - 1. Terminology equivalent to arrested, which refers to the animal supported by all its legs so that none protrudes from the other. 2. It is said of the ship or ship without masts or candles.
  • String - 1. The chains are represented in Band, Orla, Aspa with Orla, Girdle, etc. The chains appear in the Spanish and Portuguese blazons, alluding to the fact that King Moro Miramamolín had the Camp of Las Navas de Tolosa in which Sancho VIII
  • Trunk - 1. It is said of the stick or broken piece in pieces, without losing the shape of your figure. (V. truncated).
  • wreath - 1. Ornamental figure formed with flowers, herbs, intertwined or united with tapes. In heraldry there are various kinds of them.