The surname Fennelow: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Fennelow, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Fennelow. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Fennelow belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Fennelow surname.

The heraldry of Fennelow, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Fennelow in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Fennelow, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Fennelow for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Fennelow

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Fennelow surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Fennelow surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Fennelow surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Fennelow surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Fennelow.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Fennelow

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Fennelow surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Fennelow coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Fennelow heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Fennelow coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Band Head - 1. It is the result of the union of the boss and the band.
  • Bomb - 1. This figure is normally represented in the form of a ball and that a flame comes out.
  • Bordura of Spain - 1. Term used by some authors to define the alternate edge of composses loaded with a lion and a castle, representing the weapons of Castilla y León.
  • Cruz left - 1. Cross formed by semicircles on an outside.
  • Cup - 1. Similar to the chalice, cover can be represented. Formerly symbolized the richombrie and the greatness of the kingdom.
  • Flordelisado foot, cross of - 1. It is said of the cross whose foot ends in the form of a flower of lis.
  • Gate - 1. Hole left on a wall to entry to a cabin or enclosure. They have to adjust to the enamels of the figure. Otherwise it is said clarified. Symbolism: separation, revelation. (See clarified-a).
  • Gironado in Sotuer - (V. Jironado in Aspa).
  • Horseshoe - 1. It must be represented with seven nails or holes. Normally the tips of the horseshoe get towards the tip., If it should indicate. Symbolizes: protection.
  • Incarnate - 1. term erroneously used by gules (red color). (V. Gules).
  • Masquerado - 1. It is said of every wild animal especially the lion that carries a mask
  • mister - 1. Treatment that was given in Spain who was the head of a manor. 1. Nobiliar title that in some countries amounted to Barón and in others it was lower.
  • Nail - 1. Species of Maza that ends in oval or round -armed shape with aged tips. It will be placed vertically and the part destined to hurt looking towards the head of the shield.
  • Nation, weapons of - 1. They are those used by nations, kingdoms and republics.
  • Nut - 1. The fruit of walnut is represented in a natural or sinople ovoid form.
  • Open - 1. The windows and doors of castles, towers or other figures when through them the field of the shield or the enamel of the piece they had below is seen. The rustters, macles and stars or rosettes that the spurs carry, as it is
  • opposite - 1. It is said of the cut shield whose division line is part two enameled triangles from one to the other. (V. from one to the other).
  • organize - 1. Heraldry composition that is used to represent different weapons in a single blazon, generally to distinguish the various family alliances that contains a shield. 2. Organization of the various figures, furniture, pieces and ornaments that co
  • Quadrifolio - 1. Figure that represents a flower of four leaves or rounded petals and finishes on a slight tip, perforated in its center. It resembles the four -leaf clover. Used in the Central European Heraldic.
  • retired - 1. When a moving piece of an edge of the shield, it only shows a part of its extension. 2. It is also said when two furniture or figures keep a distance backwards.
  • Sayo - 1. Wide and long jacket. In the Middle Ages the nobles, they carried it under the armor. It was made of wool, leather and iron meshes. The mesh level comes from it.
  • Tip - 1. It is said of the lower third of the shield. (V. Point of the shield, proportions). 2. In Punta locution used to designate the objects that can be one or more of them that are placed at the bottom of the field. (V. Pira).
  • Vervesor, Valvasor, VarVassor - 1. Terms used in some 16th -century Catalan manuscripts in Catalonia. In the feudal era vasallo of another vassal. 2. It also applied to a vassal that had a lower range. In Catalonia they were the last category of their own feudal lords
  • Wave verado. - 1. Said see that without being silver and azur follow the order of seeing that are represented forming waves.
  • wheel - 1. It is represented in a circular and radios. Symbolism: strength.