The meaning of Bar-bar in heraldry is something you should know if you want to learn how to interpret heraldic coats of arms. Heraldry is an ancient discipline that deals with the study, design and use of emblems and symbols in relation to the history and genealogy of families and lineages, so the meaning of Bar-bar can tell you a lot about those lineages.

1. Piece that consists of the union of the bar and foot.

The terms used in heraldry are those used to describe the different elements that make up a heraldic coat of arms and their meaning. If we want to know the meaning of Bar-bar it is important to understand the structure of the coat of arms, in order to proceed to a better interpretation of it. Only with the meaning of one of the elements of the coat of arms, such as the meaning of Bar-bar, it is not possible to make a global interpretation of a coat of arms.

  • Bar - 1. Piece that diagonally crosses the shield from the left angle superior to the lower right angle. Honorable or first order piece. Its width must occupy a third of the shield. The bars if your number exceeds the four are called Li
  • Bureaulada Cruz - 1. It is the cross that is loaded with burels.
  • chair - 1. Rig for horse riding. It is usually represented in profile or front with hanging stirrups. It is preferable to indicate what time comes. 2. The chair as a throne is a symbol of sovereign authority. (V. Mount chairs).
  • Committed - 1. It is said of a band, girdle, battery, formed by undulations as a comet's tail.
  • Componed - 1. Said by some authors to the composed bordura. (V. composed bordura, reponado-a).
  • Counterbretes - 1. Row of notches of different enamels on the same girdle, stick, band or bar, do not match each other. (See counterbirt, crenellated).
  • Cruz de Santa Tecla - 1. Tao cross. Adopted as emblem by some cathedrals. (V. Tao).
  • House - 1. It is usually painted with the door, accompanied by two windows. It symbolizes hospitality and security.
  • iron rose - 1. null as a piece in Spanish heraldry, but existing in the French armor. It is constituted by an iron cross circulated and singed with four flowers converging in the tip to the sides of the cross.
  • Lattice - 1. It is said of the frozen shield, when the site intersection points are stuck from a different enamel. (V. Collected).
  • Moro, head - 1. Figure that is always represented by the head of a Moor, profile, saber and tortillada, with a tape tied on the forehead whose loop is in the neck. (V. Black).
  • Orders - 1. Term used to designate the number of pieces, equal belts repeating with alternateness between metal and color.
  • Pennant - 1. Thin and long ending cloth strip and usually triangularly.
  • Ring - 1. Said of the animal, generally the buffalo, and according to some writer, the ox or the bull can also be included with the snout crossed by a ring.
  • Snake - 1. It is represented in the shield in a stick and wave situation.
  • Sparkling - 1. It is said of the piece that ends in acute tips. (V. vibrate).
  • Spiral. - 1. whose figure is adorned with elements in a spiral form. Used in some Nordic armories, non -existent in Spain.
  • Tooth - 1. Mill or tooth wheel, usually enamel of silver or gold. 2. According to some term equivalent to the Lunnel. (V. Lunel). 3. Human dental teeth are usually painted to the natural with their roots, indicate the amount and position.
  • town - 1. Unlike the city, it is usually represented by rows of houses on some followed by others and in three or four orders as a belt, in the center a bell tower is usually added to a weather vane. In ancient shields appears l
  • Wild pig - 1. The wild boar shows only one eye and one ear, ordinarily representing an intern, raised, furious of saber color, if the opposite is not indicated, with two large fangs that are its defenses.

Therefore, in addition to the meaning of Bar-bar in heraldry, we encourage you to look for the other components of the coat of arms you wish to study. Heraldic terminology is very precise, and if you know the meaning of Bar-bar, you will not only be able to decipher heraldic coats of arms, but you will be able to create your own coats of arms. If you are passionate about heraldry, learn what Bar-bar means in heraldry, what it represents, and how Bar-bar can and should be placed within a coat of arms.

In short, knowing the meaning of Bar-bar and each element of a heraldic coat of arms can be useful in several ways. First, it can help to understand the history and genealogy of a family or lineage, knowing what Bar-bar means within the coat of arms is essential for this. Secondly, if you do not know what Bar-bar means, it is not possible to interpret the coat of arms as a complete symbol, as each element contributes to its overall meaning and the image it is intended to convey. Finally, when you know what Bar-bar means, as well as the other elements, you can design your own coat of arms or modify an existing one so that it is coherent and conveys the desired messages.