The surname Abarr: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Abarr, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Abarr. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Abarr belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Abarr surname.

The heraldry of Abarr, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Abarr in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Abarr, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Abarr for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Abarr

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Abarr surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Abarr surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Abarr surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Abarr surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Abarr.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Abarr

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Abarr surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Abarr coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Abarr heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Abarr coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancient - 1. It is said of the crown with pyramidal rays, in which the lions are usually crowning. It can also appear alone. The busts of kings or princes can be crowned to the old one, according to some European assemblies.
  • Armoriado - 1. It is said of the dress, tapestry or other elements, on which the weapons of its owner are painted. They can be in their extension or part of it.
  • Band-semeifaja - 1. Piece that results from the union of the band and half sinister of the girdle
  • Broken column - 1. A column, broken in two halves, represents the strength in heraldry.
  • dragon - 1. The lion is generally applied to every animal whose part of the body ends in dragon especially the tail.
  • dredger - 1. Figure that is represented by a dragon or lion head usually with an open mouth, engulfing or biting a flag, piece or figure. Figure widely used in Spanish heraldry.
  • EMPLOYEED - 1. Said by some authors to every figure who carries one or more plumes.
  • Human figures - 1. They include heads, eye, nose, mouth, ear, bust, shoulder, arm, open hand, fist, linked hands, breasts, whole body, leg, foot, heart, etc. Generally they should not be introduced into the blazons whole human figures but only member
  • Natural poster - 1. Cartela represented by means of a strip rolled at its ends.
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Plow - 1. Labranza Apero. It is represented looking at the right hand of the shield.
  • Profile cross - 1. Cross in which it carries a steak around it of different enamel than the figure.
  • Raising - 1. It is said of a piece or part of a piece that is placed at a higher height from which it corresponds, especially the girdle or the cabrio.
  • String - 1. The chains are represented in Band, Orla, Aspa with Orla, Girdle, etc. The chains appear in the Spanish and Portuguese blazons, alluding to the fact that King Moro Miramamolín had the Camp of Las Navas de Tolosa in which Sancho VIII
  • Tahalí - 1. Wide leather band that is held from the right shoulder to the waist and that holds the sword.
  • trace - 1. Name that some Italian traders give to Lambel. (V. Lambel).