The surname Beseman: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Beseman, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Beseman. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Beseman belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Beseman surname.

The heraldry of Beseman, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Beseman in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Beseman, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Beseman for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Beseman

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Beseman surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Beseman surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Beseman surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Beseman surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Beseman.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Beseman

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Beseman surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Beseman coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Beseman heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Beseman coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Band Head - 1. It is the result of the union of the boss and the band.
  • Composed bordura from Castilla y León - 1. Said by some authors to the bordura made up and alternate with a lion and a castle, symbols of the kingdoms of Castilla y León.
  • defending - 1. Term used to designate the tabs and fangs of wild boar, when they are of different enamel than the rest of the body.
  • diapreted - 1. Term used by some ancient authors. It was said when the field, belts, sticks and other nuanced of different colors and folk -shaped enamels or arabesque figures of different enamel or the same enamel. Very used in some armory
  • dragon - 1. The lion is generally applied to every animal whose part of the body ends in dragon especially the tail.
  • Ento - 1. Piece whose exterior profiles are crowded in shape, so that these of a profile correspond to the empty spaces of the other. 2. Said of the crooked partition in the form of different enamel clavks. 3. Division of one piece to all
  • Focused - 1. It is said of several crowns slammed to one piece or another elongated figure. 2. When the crowns and rings form a band, Palo girdle and united between them.
  • Herald - 1. position whose function consisted of notifying warfalls, carrying messages and directing official ceremonies. Subsequently, the function of this position of King of Armas was derived.
  • Langrave crown - 1. Similar to that of German Duke. (See Crown of Duke German).
  • Llana, Cruz - 1. It is said of the cross whose arms are without any highlight. (V. Cruz Llana).
  • LOSAGEADO - (V. LONSANJA).
  • Napoleonic cap - 1. The Emperor Napoleon, replaced the crown of the nobility to which he established different caps designs, always furrowed with feathers whose number indicated the dignity of the one who was possessed.
  • Patriarchal Cross - 1. CRUZ FORMED BY TWO TRANSFERS The shortest upper the lower one crossed by another vertical. (V. Cruz de Lorena).
  • Princess - 1. The infantas of Spain bring their shield in Losanje, with a crown of an infant, putting the full and non -split weapons, adorned with two green palms, such as the queens.
  • Privilege shield - 1. granted or confirmed by real mercy.
  • Pyre - 1. Triangle whose base is at the tip of the shield, being a 1/3 width and its vertex ends in the center of the boss. Honorable first order. 2. Erroneously by some by tip. Symbol of righteousness.
  • Rotea - 1. Term used by some Aragonese heraldists to fall to the cross of San Jorge.
  • Shield field - 1. Space or surface that forms the interior of the shield, on which the different elements that form the shield such as the pieces and figures are distributed. (V. partitions).
  • Spur - 1. It is normally represented with rosette and with the timing straps.
  • Teach - 1. equal to flag or banner, badge.
  • Tortoise - 1. This animal is represented showing out of the shell, head, legs and tail. This emblem is a heraldry relic of the Crusades. Perhaps to mean the slow effort, but constant in the struggle to impose Christianity. According to some