The surname Bessay: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Bessay, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Bessay. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Bessay belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Bessay surname.

The heraldry of Bessay, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Bessay in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Bessay, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Bessay for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Bessay

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Bessay surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Bessay surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Bessay surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Bessay surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Bessay.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Bessay

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Bessay surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Bessay coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Bessay heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Bessay coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Ampisher - 1. Winged snake with a second head in the tail. It is framed in the group of fantastic animals.
  • Bastard helmet - 1. The bastard helmet is put out in profile, accidental, with low visor, bordura stuck with gold. Some shields hold the wrecked helmet without being a sign of bastardy, it is usually due to the ignorance of the sculptor who designed and sculpted ignoring
  • Burgundy. - 1. This term is usually referred to the blade of this name. Call for some authors, it is an ebrancada blade that consists of two cross pieces, each of the width of the middle of them, both forming a blade. (V. Burgundy).
  • Chestnut - 1. Tree, which is usually represented with the trunk, branches and leaves of its natural or sinople color, fruity and torn. It is painted with the thick trunk and wide and round cup. 2. Color widely used in the Middle Ages in Italian assemblies.
  • Counterbrown - 1. Row of notches of different enamels on the same girdle, stick, band or bar, do not match those above with the bottom (v. Contrabretes, counterless).
  • dredger - 1. Figure that is represented by a dragon or lion head usually with an open mouth, engulfing or biting a flag, piece or figure. Figure widely used in Spanish heraldry.
  • Hawk - 1. Ave. painted and looking next to the right side.
  • mister - 1. Treatment that was given in Spain who was the head of a manor. 1. Nobiliar title that in some countries amounted to Barón and in others it was lower.
  • Orchylar - 1. It is said of the piece presented in a fork form. As the León tail, which is sometimes divided into two.
  • Perchada - 1. When a bird is placed on branches or trunks.
  • Quixote - 1. ARNÉS piece that covers the thigh.
  • Royal Crown of Spain - 1. It is formed by a circle of gold enriched with precious stones that support eight flowers, celery leaves, interspersed with one pearl, raised, holding eight headbands loaded with pearls, closed on top and in their union a globe and a
  • Serperate - 1. It is said of the cross whose arms end in snakes.
  • Smuggled - 1. It is said of the cut and flock shield in turn, so that the boss's bands are opposed to those of the other enamel, located on the tip.
  • sustained boss - 1. It is said of the lower third of the boss is of different enamel than this one than the field of the shield.
  • viscount - 1. Commissioner or delegate appointed by the Count to govern instead. Honor and dignity title before the Baron. 2. Biscount crown. (V. crowns, helmets, vizconde helmet, yelmos).
  • Well - 1. This construction is represented in a cylindrical or square form with an arc or without the iron or stone to put the pulley, chain and cube. In some shields it is represented with a cover. Symbolism: salvation, depth.