The surname Bethley: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Bethley, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Bethley. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Bethley belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Bethley surname.

The heraldry of Bethley, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Bethley in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Bethley, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Bethley for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Bethley

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Bethley surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Bethley surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Bethley surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Bethley surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Bethley.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Bethley

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Bethley surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Bethley coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Bethley heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Bethley coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Animated - 1. Term used to indicate the head of any animal, which even being separated shows life in the eyes, are usually represented with gules or gold.
  • Antlers - 1. When an animal is represented with its cornice that is its own, always with the most acute or terminal parts addressed to the boss.
  • Cruz de San Andrés - 1. Cross formed by two crossbars placed in Aspa. (V. Cruz Aspa).
  • curtaining - 1. Trochado shield which has been trunk again in some of its divisions. 2. It is said of the Potented Cross that without reaching the edges of the shield, the angles of the Potenzas have trimmed. 2. Also of any animal member or P
  • Embraced - 1. term erroneously used by clutch. (V. Embradado). 2. Said by some authors of the animal that has the arms raised at the same time with the intention of hugging or relying although without touching.
  • face - 1. The human face of its natural color or other enamels that admits the heraldry is usually painted. It can be represented in profile or front.
  • High faith - 1. Ancient authors used this phrase to designate the sword pointed up. (V. high).
  • Humiliated - 1. It is said of the piece below or under another.
  • Lattice - 1. It is said of the frozen shield, when the site intersection points are stuck from a different enamel. (V. Collected).
  • mirror - 1. Figure that is represented in various shapes and oval design, square, round, with mango, the contour or gold frame is usually enamel and the same, the center of the silver mirror.
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Orange tree - 1. Tree that is represented with branches, open and fruity cup.
  • Parrot - 1. Ave. It is usually painted green, although it can occur in another colors. It usually appears in action to march looking next to the shield. Symbol of the gentleman who proud of his blazon.
  • Princess - 1. The infantas of Spain bring their shield in Losanje, with a crown of an infant, putting the full and non -split weapons, adorned with two green palms, such as the queens.
  • Shield - 1. According to July of Atienza in its dictionary it reflects this term, it could be a scude. (V. Escudete).
  • stopped - 1. Terminology equivalent to arrested, which refers to the animal supported by all its legs so that none protrudes from the other. 2. It is said of the ship or ship without masts or candles.