The surname Bew: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Bew, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Bew. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Bew belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Bew surname.

The heraldry of Bew, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Bew in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Bew, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Bew for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Bew

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Bew surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Bew surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Bew surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Bew surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Bew.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Bew

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Bew surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Bew coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Bew heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Bew coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Capelo - 1. Timbre used in ecclesiastical heraldry. Gulls lined, with fifteen tassels pending cords placed in pyramidal form used by cardinals. Of sinople with ten tassels for the archbishops and with six of the same color for the bishops,
  • Capital - 1. Ornamental piece located at the end and at the beginning of the columns. It is normally represented naturally.
  • Chained - 1. Said of a person or animal is tied with a chain of a given enamel. If they are animals such as lions, bears, lebre them, etc., the enamel will be indicated as long as it is not iron (saber).
  • Concession weapons - 1. They are occasionally granted by a sovereign or another feudal lord, as an addition to paternal weapons, in commemoration of some feat or to indicate a relationship of any kind.
  • Cruz-Chevronada - 1. Term used to designate the Union of the Cross and the Chevron.
  • Cutted piece - 1. These pieces originated to distinguish weapons using as a brisury to differentiate the main weapons of the second. In other assemblies the cuts are used to defame the weapons of the person who has committed a crime so
  • Fig tree sheet - 1. It is represented in a lanceolate form with three leaves added to the rib. It is usually painted as sinople.
  • Filleted - 1. Piece whose edges are silhued or profiled from different enamel.
  • Hammer - 1. It is represented in heraldry with the right hand and the handle put into stick, looking at the tip.
  • Janus - 1. One of the ancient gods of Rome. He is represented with two opposite faces, one that looks at the future or the West, and the other that looks at the past or east. To him is due to the name of the month of January (janarius), month consecrated to Jano.
  • Light blue - 1. It is wrongly said by Azur. (V. Azur).
  • Nurido - 1. The plants and flowers that are not represented with the lower part of the trunk. 2. It is said of the lis flower that the lower part is missing.
  • Orchylar - 1. It is said of the piece presented in a fork form. As the León tail, which is sometimes divided into two.
  • Oval dress - (V. Dress).
  • Prince's helmet - 1. Golden helmet, ajar, lined with gules and front.
  • unmocked - 1. Tree whose cup appears flat. 2. Cabria or Chevron with the cut tip. 3. Every figure or furniture in which a piece of the top has been cut. (V. Moving, infamous).
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.
  • Whip - 1. Flexible leather or rope flexible roof.