The surname Codinton: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Codinton, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Codinton. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Codinton belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Codinton surname.

The heraldry of Codinton, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Codinton in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Codinton, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Codinton for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Codinton

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Codinton surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Codinton surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Codinton surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Codinton surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Codinton.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Codinton

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Codinton surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Codinton coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Codinton heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Codinton coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Band-semeifaja - 1. Piece that results from the union of the band and half sinister of the girdle
  • Concession weapons - 1. They are occasionally granted by a sovereign or another feudal lord, as an addition to paternal weapons, in commemoration of some feat or to indicate a relationship of any kind.
  • Cross-Banda - 1. It is said of the piece that is composed of the Union of the Cross and the Band.
  • Cruz Pate - 1. Cruz widened at all its ends and called with this definition by the French heraldists and adopted with this name by the Spaniards. (See kick).
  • Cutted piece - 1. These pieces originated to distinguish weapons using as a brisury to differentiate the main weapons of the second. In other assemblies the cuts are used to defame the weapons of the person who has committed a crime so
  • diademada - 1. It is understood as the person or any other religious figure or not to carry a circle around the head such as the Imperial Eagles and the Lion of Venice. (V. Nimbo).
  • EANZADO - 1. It is said of every animal that is represented in attitude of running, especially the deer.
  • Entrados - 1. The pieces and partitions of the shield that are nestled in the others in the form of a plug. (V. enado, nestled).
  • Fifth girdle - 1. term used by Spanish heraldist, equivalent to quinquefolia. (V. Quinquefolio)
  • Gate - 1. Hole left on a wall to entry to a cabin or enclosure. They have to adjust to the enamels of the figure. Otherwise it is said clarified. Symbolism: separation, revelation. (See clarified-a).
  • Herald - 1. position whose function consisted of notifying warfalls, carrying messages and directing official ceremonies. Subsequently, the function of this position of King of Armas was derived.
  • Lattice - 1. It is said of the frozen shield, when the site intersection points are stuck from a different enamel. (V. Collected).
  • Marquis helmet - 1. Front, silver, lined with gules and with seven grids, bordura and grilles, stuck with gold.
  • mister - 1. Treatment that was given in Spain who was the head of a manor. 1. Nobiliar title that in some countries amounted to Barón and in others it was lower.
  • Saber - 1. Name given to the black color used in heraldry, graphically represented by a vertical scratch and another horizontal forming a grid. There is a belief that blazons that carry this color are obliged to help those who have no
  • Semibanda-Faja - 1. Heraldry composition composed of the union of the upper half of the band and the girdle.
  • Surmontada - 1. Figure that leads to another on top of it, but without touching it.
  • sustained boss - 1. It is said of the lower third of the boss is of different enamel than this one than the field of the shield.