The surname Codrigton: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Codrigton, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Codrigton. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Codrigton belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Codrigton surname.

The heraldry of Codrigton, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Codrigton in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Codrigton, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Codrigton for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Codrigton

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Codrigton surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Codrigton surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Codrigton surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Codrigton surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Codrigton.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Codrigton

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Codrigton surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Codrigton coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Codrigton heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Codrigton coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Antlers - 1. When an animal is represented with its cornice that is its own, always with the most acute or terminal parts addressed to the boss.
  • Avellana Cross - 1. Cross formed by four hazelnuts.
  • Bicuciferous - 1. It is the result of a full and narrow cross, highlighted on a Sotuer or a flanquis.
  • chair - 1. Rig for horse riding. It is usually represented in profile or front with hanging stirrups. It is preferable to indicate what time comes. 2. The chair as a throne is a symbol of sovereign authority. (V. Mount chairs).
  • Cruz-Chevronada - 1. Term used to designate the Union of the Cross and the Chevron.
  • decreasing - 1. The growing whose tips look to the sinister side.
  • dragon - 1. The lion is generally applied to every animal whose part of the body ends in dragon especially the tail.
  • Farm in bar - 1. It is said of the shield divided into three equal parts by lines that go from the sinister canton of the boss to the right hand of the beard or tip of the shield.
  • Flordelisado foot, cross of - 1. It is said of the cross whose foot ends in the form of a flower of lis.
  • Intern - 1. It is said of every animal that is represented in an attitude of walking, usually in the direction of the right -hand flank of the shield. Some writer uses this term erroneously to indicate a human figure placed or in an attitude of moving. This term
  • Laureada, Cruz. - 1. Spanish award. It is represented by four swords with the tips to the sides of the shield and a laurel crown.
  • Pennant - 1. Thin and long ending cloth strip and usually triangularly.
  • Set - 1. It is explained in the girdles, sticks, bands and other classes shaded or drawn from foliage our heraldists of three different words are worth to express the meaning of this voice, when they all have the same meaning: diapreted, biated and p
  • String - 1. The chains are represented in Band, Orla, Aspa with Orla, Girdle, etc. The chains appear in the Spanish and Portuguese blazons, alluding to the fact that King Moro Miramamolín had the Camp of Las Navas de Tolosa in which Sancho VIII
  • Tip - 1. It is said of the lower third of the shield. (V. Point of the shield, proportions). 2. In Punta locution used to designate the objects that can be one or more of them that are placed at the bottom of the field. (V. Pira).
  • town - 1. Unlike the city, it is usually represented by rows of houses on some followed by others and in three or four orders as a belt, in the center a bell tower is usually added to a weather vane. In ancient shields appears l