The surname Coenders: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Coenders, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Coenders. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Coenders belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Coenders surname.

The heraldry of Coenders, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Coenders in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Coenders, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Coenders for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Coenders

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Coenders surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Coenders surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Coenders surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Coenders surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Coenders.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Coenders

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Coenders surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Coenders coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Coenders heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Coenders coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Aguila explained. - 1. It is applied to eagles when they have two heads, and extended wings. According to some authors, such as Father Menestier, he understands this term to all the aguilas that have extended eagles.
  • Bifurcado foot, cross of - 1. It is said of the cross whose foot is cracked divided into two halves. (V. Bifurcado standing cross).
  • Bread - 1. Said by some to the bezantes or roeles who present themselves with a fine cross or blade in its center, to mean bread.
  • Corbo - 1. Term used by some authors to designate the Roque. (V. Roque).
  • Embroidered - 1. It is said of every piece that has the edge of different enamel. It is synonymous with fillet. Used at crosses, bands, confalones, chevrones, and the and themes. etc., that have the edges of different enamel and that is regularly a fillet of the sixth
  • Extremities - 1. Generic name that serves to designate the tongue, teeth, nails, horns and animal legs.
  • fair - 1. Combat on horseback and with a spear in which the medieval knights made in tournaments and large military parties or chivalrous to demonstrate their expertise and skill in the management of weapons. (V. Tournament).
  • Hoarding - 1. It is understood of the blazon that is united, together to designate an alliance. 2. In ancient treaties this term was used for fushes, losanjes and macles, when they touch their flanks, without forming a sown. 3. It is said of the furniture, usually
  • Humiliated - 1. It is said of the piece below or under another.
  • Kick - 1. Term used to designate any piece or figure especially the Sotuer and the cross whose arms are curved widening in its limb. You can present the cross various forms and ways which must be indicated. (V. Pate, Cruz Teutonic
  • Ortiga blade - 1. SHEET IN ENDENTED FORM, BELONGING TO THE ORTIGAS PLANT. Figure used in German heraldry.
  • Punta and fallen - 1. Curvilíneo triangle that has its vertex in the lower third of the shield and its base in the lower part of it.
  • Sacred Ceremonies Figures - 1. Báculos, candelers, candles, bells, custodians, copones, reliquaries and rosaries, their enamel and situation in the shield must be indicated.
  • SCIENCE TREE - 1. The tree of science is represented, with four branches forming a circle up, and in each of them with thirteen leaves. Very rare figure in Spanish heraldry.
  • Stribted bridge - 1. The one who carries triangular pieces to sustain the vaults.
  • Verbesor crown - 1. Ancient title of Catalonia. Enamel Gold Circle.