The surname Coester: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Coester, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Coester. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Coester belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Coester surname.

The heraldry of Coester, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Coester in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Coester, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Coester for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Coester

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Coester surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Coester surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Coester surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Coester surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Coester.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Coester

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Coester surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Coester coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Coester heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Coester coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Bound - 1. The pieces or figures tied by a tape or cord. 2. Term that is designated to the hawk or bird of prey that carries its legs tied by a cord. (V. Liadas, liado).
  • Brand new sticks - 1. Said by some authors to the waved and pyramidal sticks in the form of flame.
  • Chimeric figures - (V. Ampistra, Argos, Arpía, Basilisco, Centauro, Dragon, Sphinx, Phoenix, Tap, Hidra, Janus, Chimera, Salamandra, Triton, Unicorn).
  • Convent - 1. The convent must be represented by two or three bells united by wall canvases, with one door each.
  • Cruz Pate - 1. Cruz widened at all its ends and called with this definition by the French heraldists and adopted with this name by the Spaniards. (See kick).
  • diademada - 1. It is understood as the person or any other religious figure or not to carry a circle around the head such as the Imperial Eagles and the Lion of Venice. (V. Nimbo).
  • Farm in bar - 1. It is said of the shield divided into three equal parts by lines that go from the sinister canton of the boss to the right hand of the beard or tip of the shield.
  • Fruited - 1. Tree or bush loaded with the fruit that is own painted by a different enamel from the rest of the figure.
  • Galloping - 1. It is said of the animal in gallop's posture and action.
  • House - 1. It is usually painted with the door, accompanied by two windows. It symbolizes hospitality and security.
  • Llana, Cruz - 1. It is said of the cross whose arms are without any highlight. (V. Cruz Llana).
  • Nail - 1. Species of Maza that ends in oval or round -armed shape with aged tips. It will be placed vertically and the part destined to hurt looking towards the head of the shield.
  • Orders - 1. Term used to designate the number of pieces, equal belts repeating with alternateness between metal and color.
  • shouted out - 1. It applies to any animal that is arrested or taken between ties or networks.
  • trace - 1. Name that some Italian traders give to Lambel. (V. Lambel).
  • Vain - 1. Terms used in some ancient nobles to describe the piece or vacuum or empty figure inside letting the shield field see. (V. empty, bucked, hollow, empty, empty, vain.).