The surname Cogliandro: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Cogliandro, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Cogliandro. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Cogliandro belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Cogliandro surname.

The heraldry of Cogliandro, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Cogliandro in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Cogliandro, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Cogliandro for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Cogliandro

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Cogliandro surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Cogliandro surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Cogliandro surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Cogliandro surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Cogliandro.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Cogliandro

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Cogliandro surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Cogliandro coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Cogliandro heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Cogliandro coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ampisher - 1. Winged snake with a second head in the tail. It is framed in the group of fantastic animals.
  • Broked battery - 1. It is the battery composed of three batteries, sometimes added by flowers of lis or other figures.
  • Broken column - 1. A column, broken in two halves, represents the strength in heraldry.
  • Cart - 1. Long and low with two wheels. It is painted in profile with the colors indicated.
  • Corbo - 1. Term used by some authors to designate the Roque. (V. Roque).
  • Cruz de San Andrés - 1. Cross formed by two crossbars placed in Aspa. (V. Cruz Aspa).
  • dextropiro, destrocero, dextrocero - 1. Terms used to designate the entire human arm, always showing the elbow. Movie of the right -hand flank, dressed, naked or armed.
  • diademada - 1. It is understood as the person or any other religious figure or not to carry a circle around the head such as the Imperial Eagles and the Lion of Venice. (V. Nimbo).
  • Embroidered - 1. It is said of every piece that has the edge of different enamel. It is synonymous with fillet. Used at crosses, bands, confalones, chevrones, and the and themes. etc., that have the edges of different enamel and that is regularly a fillet of the sixth
  • Fruited - 1. Tree or bush loaded with the fruit that is own painted by a different enamel from the rest of the figure.
  • Full weapons - 1. To those of the head of the family without any modification or addition and that they can also carry the heir of the family, but not the second children who were forced to introduce any difference, revealing that they were not the head of
  • gibelin - 1. Term used to designate the merletas of a building when they carry a notch or cleft in their upper part.
  • Kite - 1. It is represented in the form of an eight -pointed star (some put it six, eight and twelve rays), with the tail waved or straight, whose length is three times the rays. Its normal position is in stick to the boss although it is also represented situ
  • LORADO - 1. It is said of the fish whose fins are of different enamel. (V. Excued-do).
  • Moro, head - 1. Figure that is always represented by the head of a Moor, profile, saber and tortillada, with a tape tied on the forehead whose loop is in the neck. (V. Black).
  • Nail - 1. Species of Maza that ends in oval or round -armed shape with aged tips. It will be placed vertically and the part destined to hurt looking towards the head of the shield.
  • Ringed - 1. Piece whose arms are finished off with rings especially La Cruz and the Sotuer. 2. The sepulchral that has the rings or ring of an enamel different from the color of slab. (V. Clechado, rough-A).
  • shouted out - 1. It applies to any animal that is arrested or taken between ties or networks.
  • stapes - 1. Your heraldry drawing does not have a fixed design although straight lines are generally avoided.
  • Stribted bridge - 1. The one who carries triangular pieces to sustain the vaults.