The surname Coisse: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Coisse, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Coisse. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Coisse belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Coisse surname.

The heraldry of Coisse, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Coisse in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Coisse, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Coisse for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Coisse

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Coisse surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Coisse surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Coisse surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Coisse surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Coisse.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Coisse

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Coisse surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Coisse coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Coisse heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Coisse coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Appendix - 1. This term is applied to animals when represented with the limbs, tail, horns and nails of different enamel.
  • Bastard helmet - 1. The bastard helmet is put out in profile, accidental, with low visor, bordura stuck with gold. Some shields hold the wrecked helmet without being a sign of bastardy, it is usually due to the ignorance of the sculptor who designed and sculpted ignoring
  • Bretesada battery - 1. Bretested battery is understood as it is formed by bretes. (V. Bretesado).
  • Cabo de Armería - 1. It is said of the main relative, head of his lineage in Navarra. Also called Palacio Cabo. (V. Cabo de Armería).
  • chair - 1. Rig for horse riding. It is usually represented in profile or front with hanging stirrups. It is preferable to indicate what time comes. 2. The chair as a throne is a symbol of sovereign authority. (V. Mount chairs).
  • Cross-Banda - 1. It is said of the piece that is composed of the Union of the Cross and the Band.
  • Cup - 1. Similar to the chalice, cover can be represented. Formerly symbolized the richombrie and the greatness of the kingdom.
  • defending - 1. Term used to designate the tabs and fangs of wild boar, when they are of different enamel than the rest of the body.
  • Domus - 1. House or tower that is represented as a castle with two towers. Its heraldic design depends on the armature of each country.
  • Heurtes - 1. Said by some authors to the Roeles de Azur. (V. Roel).
  • King's head - 1. It is represented in profile or front, with the bearded and crowned to the old.
  • Lazarista - 1. Order of Knights instituted in the holy places, whose purpose was to attend the lepers. His badge was an eight -pointed cross, as a star, sinople. 2. Knight belonging to said order.
  • Major triangle - 1. Term used by some old heraldists when describing the provision of any piece in two and one, or ordered. (See well ordered, two and one, triangle).
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Santiago, Cruz de - 1. Sword -shaped gules color. Symbol of the Order of Santiago de la Espada, instituted in 1175. It was initially known by the Order of the Frailes of Cáceres.
  • Secondon-na - 1. Son or daughter who is not the firstborn of the offspring of a family in which there is mayorazgo.
  • Shield heart - 1. It is said of the abyss or center of the shield.
  • String - 1. The chains are represented in Band, Orla, Aspa with Orla, Girdle, etc. The chains appear in the Spanish and Portuguese blazons, alluding to the fact that King Moro Miramamolín had the Camp of Las Navas de Tolosa in which Sancho VIII
  • Turtledove - 1. Ave. It is represented with folded wings. It symbolizes as well as dove marital fidelity. (V. Paloma).
  • Venus - 1. Sinople color in the assemblies of the sovereigns. 2. Female mythological figure, represented by a young naked woman with long hair. According to some heraldists, it must be represented dressed.