The surname Colamarco: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colamarco, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colamarco. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colamarco belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colamarco surname.

The heraldry of Colamarco, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colamarco in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colamarco, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colamarco for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colamarco

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colamarco surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colamarco surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colamarco surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colamarco surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colamarco.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colamarco

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colamarco surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colamarco coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colamarco heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colamarco coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Bezante Tortillo - 1. Said of the bezante when it appears cut, party, trchado or slice of color and metal, provided that he appears first. Also called tortillo-beza.
  • Cantado - 1. When a main piece is accompanied by another in the cantons of the shield. Generally the Cross or the Sotuer accompanied by four pieces or figures arranged in the flanks between the arms 2. It is said of four figures or furniture placed in the four
  • Dignity crown - 1. It is the crown that corresponds to a civil, ecclesiastical or military dignity for its position, and that, according to most tradadists, correspond with slight variants to those of Duke, Marquis, Conde and Vizconde.
  • Embraced - 1. term erroneously used by clutch. (V. Embradado). 2. Said by some authors of the animal that has the arms raised at the same time with the intention of hugging or relying although without touching.
  • gonfalon - 1. Minor banner. Used from the Middle Ages by some European states to the present day. Its design is variable although generally two or three three rounded or tip ends stand out.
  • House - 1. It is usually painted with the door, accompanied by two windows. It symbolizes hospitality and security.
  • Lynx - 1. The lynx that usually appears in the blazons does not present the fur stained with dark moles, such as the one known in Spain, but similar to the African, of uniform leonia layer and a little larger than the European. Sight symbol and by definition D
  • PALO-SEMIBARRA - 1. Composite piece resulting from the Union of the stick and the upper half of the bar.
  • Pennant - 1. Thin and long ending cloth strip and usually triangularly.
  • Saber - 1. Name given to the black color used in heraldry, graphically represented by a vertical scratch and another horizontal forming a grid. There is a belief that blazons that carry this color are obliged to help those who have no
  • Santa Catalina wheel. - 1. Symbolic wheel of the martyrdom of Santa Catalina. It consists of wheel inserted with metal blades, to be torment. It is presented in front.
  • unmocked - 1. Tree whose cup appears flat. 2. Cabria or Chevron with the cut tip. 3. Every figure or furniture in which a piece of the top has been cut. (V. Moving, infamous).
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.
  • Wave verado. - 1. Said see that without being silver and azur follow the order of seeing that are represented forming waves.