The surname Colarde: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colarde, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colarde. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colarde belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colarde surname.

The heraldry of Colarde, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colarde in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colarde, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colarde for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colarde

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colarde surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colarde surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colarde surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colarde surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colarde.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colarde

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colarde surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colarde coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colarde heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colarde coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • ASPADA CRUZ - 1. Used by Emperor Carlo Magno. Composed of cross in "P" and in its center a blade. Symbol of Christ.
  • Cabo de Armería house - 1. SOLAR HOUSE OF THE MAJOR relative, head of his lineage in Navarra. Also called Palacio Cabo de Armería.
  • Center of the boss. - 1. It is said of the head point of the boss. Honorable piece.
  • Cruz Aspa - 1. Cross in which its crossbars form a blade. (See Cruz de San Andrés).
  • dimidiate. - 1. It is also used to designate the sized party shield which is the result of part two shields of weapons forming a new one with the right hand of the first and half sinister of the second. Its use was frequent throughout the thirteenth century, although
  • espalier - 1. Said by some writer to point out the lattice, key to another enamel, for example, in the surname Trussel. Of gules, a back, closed of gold.
  • Exhaust - 1. Compose or distribute the shield, piece, figure, in escapes.
  • Extraordinary partition - 1. It is the partition formed by the slice the trchado and the slide. Very rare partition in the Spanish and European and difficult Blasonar heraldry. 2. Partition formed by the cut, party and semiparite towards the tip.
  • Family shield - 1. They are formed by the barracks or barracks exclusively to the first last name.
  • In a hurry - 1. It is said of every animal that is represented in attitude of running.
  • Italian shield - 1. They are characterized by carrying many of them toilet, oval and horsehead.
  • Parakeet - 1. Ave. is represented by its natural or sinople color. Used in the different French armor.
  • Quartered - 1. Term used by some old heraldists to define the quarter. (V. Quarter).
  • ROEL JIRONADO - 1. The Jironado Roel is usually twelve alternate and curved pieces, six color and six metal.
  • Smuggled - 1. It is said of the cut and flock shield in turn, so that the boss's bands are opposed to those of the other enamel, located on the tip.
  • stapes - 1. Your heraldry drawing does not have a fixed design although straight lines are generally avoided.
  • unmocked - 1. Tree whose cup appears flat. 2. Cabria or Chevron with the cut tip. 3. Every figure or furniture in which a piece of the top has been cut. (V. Moving, infamous).
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.
  • Valley - 1. It is represented between two mountains.
  • Winged Leon - 1. Chimerical figure. It is represented with extended wings.