The surname Colastra: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colastra, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colastra. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colastra belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colastra surname.

The heraldry of Colastra, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colastra in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colastra, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colastra for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colastra

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colastra surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colastra surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colastra surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colastra surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colastra.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colastra

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colastra surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colastra coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colastra heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colastra coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Bastard helmet - 1. The bastard helmet is put out in profile, accidental, with low visor, bordura stuck with gold. Some shields hold the wrecked helmet without being a sign of bastardy, it is usually due to the ignorance of the sculptor who designed and sculpted ignoring
  • Bretesado - 1. It is said of the piece that carries battlements in all its parts, lower, upper and sides or edges of the shield.
  • Cart - 1. Long and low with two wheels. It is painted in profile with the colors indicated.
  • compensated - 1. It is said of any piece or figure that carries as garrison a fillet, except at one of its ends.
  • Contoured - 1. Figure that in its contour is profiled of different enamel. (V. Contorn, profiled).
  • Crown of the Infantes de Castilla - 1. Like the real one, but without headband.
  • decused - 1. It is said of the cross -shaped cross of San Andrés. (V. Cruz de San Andrés, Aspa).
  • Dignity crown - 1. It is the crown that corresponds to a civil, ecclesiastical or military dignity for its position, and that, according to most tradadists, correspond with slight variants to those of Duke, Marquis, Conde and Vizconde.
  • Full weapons - 1. To those of the head of the family without any modification or addition and that they can also carry the heir of the family, but not the second children who were forced to introduce any difference, revealing that they were not the head of
  • Furious - 1. It is said of the bull, cow or another quadruped animal in rampant attitude, raised by its hind legs. (V. agitated).
  • gules - 1. Heraldic name of the red color. It is represented graphically by vertical lines. Symbol: Value, strength and intrepidity and faith of the martyrs. 2. It exists in the French and German armories of the fourteent
  • Holding band - 1. Band formed by edges The exteriors finished notches. (V. crushed, crushed).
  • Jealousy - 1. Blazon or piece when covered with canes, elongated pieces, such as trailers or spears on the form of a blade or intersecting as a lattice or fence. (V. frozen).
  • manor - 1. Territory subject to the domain of the Lord or the lady and equal to the administration of one of them.
  • Onion - 1. It is represented with rounded or elongated head, cut and with roots.
  • Orders - 1. Term used to designate the number of pieces, equal belts repeating with alternateness between metal and color.
  • Oval shield - 1. Common to all the armories, especially the Italian. (V. Shields).
  • Shield field - 1. Space or surface that forms the interior of the shield, on which the different elements that form the shield such as the pieces and figures are distributed. (V. partitions).
  • Spectrum - 1. Composite piece resulting from the boss's union and a stick that touches the right -handed flank. Used in Italian armor.
  • Venablo - 1. SHORT AND LAND DARDO OR LAND Consisting of a thin and cylindrical rod finished on an iron leaf in the alveolate shape. In the sixteenth century in Spain, it was the distinctive of Alferez. (V. arrow, spear).