The surname Coldbreath: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Coldbreath, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Coldbreath. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Coldbreath belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Coldbreath surname.

The heraldry of Coldbreath, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Coldbreath in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Coldbreath, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Coldbreath for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Coldbreath

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Coldbreath surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Coldbreath surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Coldbreath surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Coldbreath surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Coldbreath.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Coldbreath

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Coldbreath surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Coldbreath coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Coldbreath heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Coldbreath coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Alternate Bordura - 1. Said by some authors to the bordura through which different pieces or figures are happening one behind the other along the bordura.
  • Ancorada - 1. It is said of a cross, of a Sotuer and, in general of any piece, whose limbs end up in the way of the anchors. (V. anchored).
  • Bastard helmet - 1. The bastard helmet is put out in profile, accidental, with low visor, bordura stuck with gold. Some shields hold the wrecked helmet without being a sign of bastardy, it is usually due to the ignorance of the sculptor who designed and sculpted ignoring
  • Brazier - 1. Domestic utensil used to give heat to the feet in the rooms. It is usually represented with fiery or flaming embers.
  • Coquilla - 1. Term used by some authors to designate the Venera. (V. Venera).
  • Cruz Pate - 1. Cruz widened at all its ends and called with this definition by the French heraldists and adopted with this name by the Spaniards. (See kick).
  • Exhaust - 1. Compose or distribute the shield, piece, figure, in escapes.
  • Fierceness - 1. Term used to designate any animal that teaches the teeth. 2. When the fish are painted with the tail and the fins of gules, the whales and the dolphins are usually.
  • Herald - 1. position whose function consisted of notifying warfalls, carrying messages and directing official ceremonies. Subsequently, the function of this position of King of Armas was derived.
  • Holding, Anglesada - 1. Piece whose profile is made up of tangent semicircles. 2. The pieces or the cross, whose outer part is formed by small circles. 3. Partition line formed by small semicircles, with the tips out. (V. Anglelada, to
  • Marquis helmet - 1. Front, silver, lined with gules and with seven grids, bordura and grilles, stuck with gold.
  • Nebulad band - 1. Band formed by small undulations as clouds. (V. nebulated).
  • Oval dress - (V. Dress).
  • shouted out - 1. It applies to any animal that is arrested or taken between ties or networks.
  • Spider - 1. This insect is represented in front of profile or back, on your fabric or without it.
  • stapes - 1. Your heraldry drawing does not have a fixed design although straight lines are generally avoided.
  • Teach - 1. equal to flag or banner, badge.
  • unmocked - 1. Tree whose cup appears flat. 2. Cabria or Chevron with the cut tip. 3. Every figure or furniture in which a piece of the top has been cut. (V. Moving, infamous).