The surname Colin: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Colin, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Colin. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Colin belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Colin surname.

The heraldry of Colin, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Colin in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Colin, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Colin for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Colin

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Colin surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Colin surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Colin surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Colin surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Colin.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Colin

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Colin surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Colin coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Colin heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Colin coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ameda - 1. Piece similar to the poster, but of greater length. Used in Anglo -Saxon armor.
  • Back posts - 1. Term used by some authors to designate the figures that are turning their backs or opposites.
  • Bandy Band - 1. Band formed by Blacks. (V. countercharged).
  • Belgium Crown - 1. Similar to the Spanish and that of Bavaria. (See Crown of Bavaria, Spanish Corona).
  • Bollones - 1. Said of the nails of different enamel than the piece or armor that carries them.
  • Boss and lifting - 1. Curvilíneo triangle that has its vertex in the center of the lower line of the boss and its base at the bottom of it.
  • Chopped - 1. It applies to the bird that has the peak of different enamel than the rest of the body. (V. Scholarship).
  • compensated - 1. It is said of any piece or figure that carries as garrison a fillet, except at one of its ends.
  • Curvilineo footwear - 1. It is said of the shield divided by two curved diagonals that leave the chief angles, being at the tip of the shield.
  • decused - 1. It is said of the cross -shaped cross of San Andrés. (V. Cruz de San Andrés, Aspa).
  • Embraced - 1. term erroneously used by clutch. (V. Embradado). 2. Said by some authors of the animal that has the arms raised at the same time with the intention of hugging or relying although without touching.
  • Montesa, order of - 1. Substitute military order of that of the Temple, created in 1317. Its badge, Modern Montesa Cruz, is equal to that of its congeners of Alcantara and Calatrava, of Saber, with a flat cross of gules loading it.
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial
  • Set - 1. It is explained in the girdles, sticks, bands and other classes shaded or drawn from foliage our heraldists of three different words are worth to express the meaning of this voice, when they all have the same meaning: diapreted, biated and p
  • Sparkling - 1. It is said of the piece that ends in acute tips. (V. vibrate).
  • Stribted bridge - 1. The one who carries triangular pieces to sustain the vaults.