The surname Emelander: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emelander, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emelander. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emelander belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emelander surname.

The heraldry of Emelander, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emelander in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emelander, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emelander for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emelander

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emelander surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emelander surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emelander surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emelander surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emelander.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emelander

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emelander surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emelander coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emelander heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emelander coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancorada Cruz - 1. Cross in which their ends separate and end in the form of anchor.
  • Capelo - 1. Timbre used in ecclesiastical heraldry. Gulls lined, with fifteen tassels pending cords placed in pyramidal form used by cardinals. Of sinople with ten tassels for the archbishops and with six of the same color for the bishops,
  • Chimeric figures - (V. Ampistra, Argos, Arpía, Basilisco, Centauro, Dragon, Sphinx, Phoenix, Tap, Hidra, Janus, Chimera, Salamandra, Triton, Unicorn).
  • displaced - 1. term used to designate the piece whose length half of which moves to the right -handed side, sinister towards the boss or the tip of the shield. You only maintain contact with the other half by a point as well as the girdle. If the separation line
  • distributions - 1. They are the subdivisions that occur in the headquarters of the shield, being the result of dividing it into more than one partition of the existing one.
  • espalier - 1. Said by some writer to point out the lattice, key to another enamel, for example, in the surname Trussel. Of gules, a back, closed of gold.
  • Hoarding - 1. It is understood of the blazon that is united, together to designate an alliance. 2. In ancient treaties this term was used for fushes, losanjes and macles, when they touch their flanks, without forming a sown. 3. It is said of the furniture, usually
  • Laureada, Cruz. - 1. Spanish award. It is represented by four swords with the tips to the sides of the shield and a laurel crown.
  • Major triangle - 1. Term used by some old heraldists when describing the provision of any piece in two and one, or ordered. (See well ordered, two and one, triangle).
  • Sayo - 1. Wide and long jacket. In the Middle Ages the nobles, they carried it under the armor. It was made of wool, leather and iron meshes. The mesh level comes from it.
  • snake - 1. Snake represented undulating, noda or biting your tail. (V. undulating, nuda).
  • Stick-semibanda - 1. It is the result of the union and the lower half of the band.
  • sustained boss - 1. It is said of the lower third of the boss is of different enamel than this one than the field of the shield.
  • Venablo - 1. SHORT AND LAND DARDO OR LAND Consisting of a thin and cylindrical rod finished on an iron leaf in the alveolate shape. In the sixteenth century in Spain, it was the distinctive of Alferez. (V. arrow, spear).