The surname Emorine: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emorine, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emorine. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emorine belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emorine surname.

The heraldry of Emorine, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emorine in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emorine, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emorine for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emorine

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emorine surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emorine surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emorine surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emorine surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emorine.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emorine

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emorine surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emorine coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emorine heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emorine coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancorada - 1. It is said of a cross, of a Sotuer and, in general of any piece, whose limbs end up in the way of the anchors. (V. anchored).
  • Armiñada Cruz - 1. It is said of the Cross formed of Armiños.
  • Brazier - 1. Domestic utensil used to give heat to the feet in the rooms. It is usually represented with fiery or flaming embers.
  • Calf - 1. Its characteristic is to represent you without cornice.
  • Counterbrown - 1. Row of notches of different enamels on the same girdle, stick, band or bar, do not match those above with the bottom (v. Contrabretes, counterless).
  • diapreted - 1. Term used by some ancient authors. It was said when the field, belts, sticks and other nuanced of different colors and folk -shaped enamels or arabesque figures of different enamel or the same enamel. Very used in some armory
  • dimidiate. - 1. It is also used to designate the sized party shield which is the result of part two shields of weapons forming a new one with the right hand of the first and half sinister of the second. Its use was frequent throughout the thirteenth century, although
  • Elm - 1. This tree is represented elongated. Symbolism: Dignity.
  • Figure - 1. term used in Spanish heraldry to define the objects or loads that adorn the coat of arms. They can be distinguished in natural forms: animals, vegetables, human beings with their members or part of them, elements such as earth, water, fire
  • Flordelisado horn - 1. Horn finished in lis flower. Employee in the Germanic armories.
  • iron rose - 1. null as a piece in Spanish heraldry, but existing in the French armor. It is constituted by an iron cross circulated and singed with four flowers converging in the tip to the sides of the cross.
  • Lord - 1. Honorary title with which members of the high English nobility are distinguished.
  • Oval shield - 1. Common to all the armories, especially the Italian. (V. Shields).
  • Ringed - 1. Piece whose arms are finished off with rings especially La Cruz and the Sotuer. 2. The sepulchral that has the rings or ring of an enamel different from the color of slab. (V. Clechado, rough-A).
  • See you on tip - 1. Said of the seeing that the tips are placed in opposition with the bases of other see you, that is, so that the tip of the silver Vero, is next to the base of the same metal in the upper row and that of Azur will also find in the same situation
  • trimmed - 1. The pieces whose ends do not touch the edges of the Blazon. 2. It also said of the blade, cross or piece that does not touch the edges of the shield. (V. shortened).