The surname Emrith: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Emrith, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Emrith. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Emrith belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Emrith surname.

The heraldry of Emrith, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Emrith in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Emrith, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Emrith for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Emrith

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Emrith surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Emrith surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Emrith surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Emrith surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Emrith.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Emrith

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Emrith surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Emrith coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Emrith heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Emrith coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Ancient - 1. It is said of the crown with pyramidal rays, in which the lions are usually crowning. It can also appear alone. The busts of kings or princes can be crowned to the old one, according to some European assemblies.
  • Ancorada - 1. It is said of a cross, of a Sotuer and, in general of any piece, whose limbs end up in the way of the anchors. (V. anchored).
  • Embraced - 1. term erroneously used by clutch. (V. Embradado). 2. Said by some authors of the animal that has the arms raised at the same time with the intention of hugging or relying although without touching.
  • Explained - (V. Expaste).
  • Footwear - 1. It is said of the shield divided by two diagonals that leave the chief angles, being at the tip of the shield.
  • Knot - 1. Loop that is represented by a tape, rope, with two ends and forming various circles in the center of them.
  • Major triangle - 1. Term used by some old heraldists when describing the provision of any piece in two and one, or ordered. (See well ordered, two and one, triangle).
  • Put together a shield - 1. Compose a blazon with all precise elements, loads, accompaniments, external and internal ornaments, according to the heraldry rules.
  • roeado - 1. Shield, piece or figure loaded with Roeles in number greater than nine.
  • Royal Crown of Poland - 1. Similar to the Spanish, surmontada of a silver eagle.
  • Set - 1. It is explained in the girdles, sticks, bands and other classes shaded or drawn from foliage our heraldists of three different words are worth to express the meaning of this voice, when they all have the same meaning: diapreted, biated and p
  • Sils - 1. They are those of the scales and if not specify it they will have the same enamel as the rest of the figure.
  • Snake - 1. It is represented in the shield in a stick and wave situation.
  • Stribted bridge - 1. The one who carries triangular pieces to sustain the vaults.
  • Terrace - 1. Figure that represents the ground and in which other figures are placed, it is located at the tip of the shield, they are usually painted in sinople or natural. Occupies the beard or campaign of the shield as a land and usually resembles an irregula mo
  • Vallea - 1. Big neck clothing and returned on the back, shoulders and chest used especially in Flanders (Belgium) and introduced in Spain in the 16th century.