The surname Endahl: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Endahl, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Endahl. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Endahl belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Endahl surname.

The heraldry of Endahl, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Endahl in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Endahl, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Endahl for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Endahl

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Endahl surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Endahl surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Endahl surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Endahl surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Endahl.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Endahl

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Endahl surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Endahl coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Endahl heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Endahl coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Adorned - 1. When one piece is loaded with another figure. 2. Also said of any dress piece that is loaded with a piece or figure. (V. Adommed).
  • ASPADA CRUZ - 1. Used by Emperor Carlo Magno. Composed of cross in "P" and in its center a blade. Symbol of Christ.
  • Avis, order of the Avis - 1. Military Order already extinguished, founded in Portugal in 1162, also called Order of San Benito de Avis. Bring Flordelisada Cruz of Sinople. (V. Alcántara).
  • Back posts - 1. Term used by some authors to designate the figures that are turning their backs or opposites.
  • Bifurcado foot, cross of - 1. It is said of the cross whose foot is cracked divided into two halves. (V. Bifurcado standing cross).
  • Capital - 1. Ornamental piece located at the end and at the beginning of the columns. It is normally represented naturally.
  • Crossed - 1. Apply to the pieces that carry an overlapping cross. 2. It is said of the gentleman that enlisted for some crusade. 3. It is said of any figure that at its upper end is added a cross, usually the globe and flags.
  • Cruz Pate - 1. Cruz widened at all its ends and called with this definition by the French heraldists and adopted with this name by the Spaniards. (See kick).
  • Failed Chevron - 1. This term is applied to the chevron in which the vertex of the latter is separated. (V. failed).
  • Fifth girdle - 1. term used by Spanish heraldist, equivalent to quinquefolia. (V. Quinquefolio)
  • Hammer - 1. It is represented in heraldry with the right hand and the handle put into stick, looking at the tip.
  • Heurtes - 1. Said by some authors to the Roeles de Azur. (V. Roel).
  • High faith - 1. Ancient authors used this phrase to designate the sword pointed up. (V. high).
  • Humiliated - 1. It is said of the piece below or under another.
  • Napoleonic cap - 1. The Emperor Napoleon, replaced the crown of the nobility to which he established different caps designs, always furrowed with feathers whose number indicated the dignity of the one who was possessed.
  • net - 1. Networks used for fishing or to catch an animal. They are represented in their natural forms.
  • Nuanced - 1. It is said of the Ruante peacock, whose feathers present stains. 2. When insects blasson with an enamel different from the color that is their own. (V. Ruante)
  • Of Heraudie - 1. It is the oldest heraldic treaty that is known, written in the Anglo-Normanda language by the years 1341 and 1345, according to M. de Riquer. Although there are some even older from the end of the thirteenth century, in the form of rolls. (See armorial