The surname Endress: heraldry, coat of arms and coat of arms

If your surname is Endress, surely on more than one occasion you have wondered about the heraldry of the surname Endress. Likewise, you might be interested if the surname Endress belongs to a relative of yours or someone very important to you. The heraldry of surnames is a fascinating world that still attracts a lot of attention today, and that is why more and more people are asking about the heraldry of the Endress surname.

The heraldry of Endress, a complicated topic

Sometimes it can be very confusing to try to explain how the heraldry of surnames works, however, we are going to try to explain the heraldry of the surname Endress in the simplest possible way. We recommend that to better understand everything we are going to tell you about the heraldry of the surname Endress, if you are totally unaware of how the coats of arms and heraldry came about, go to our main page and read the general explanation we give you there, that way you can better appreciate everything we have compiled about the heraldry of the surname Endress for you.

Coat of arms, coat of arms and heraldry of Endress

Similarly, and to make things easier, since we understand that most of the people looking for information about the Endress surname heraldry are especially interested in the coat of arms of the Endress surname, its composition, the meaning of its elements and if there are several coats of arms for the Endress surname, as well as everything that may have to do with the coat of arms of the Endress surname; we have taken the liberty of being flexible and using the words heraldry and coat of arms interchangeably when referring to the coat of arms of Endress.

Contributions to the heraldry of the surname Endress

We hope that the flexibility on the coat of arms of the Endress surname will not be taken as a lack of seriousness on our part, since we are constantly investigating to be able to offer the most rigorous information possible on the Endress coats of arms. However, if you have more information about the Endress heraldry, or you notice an error that needs to be corrected, please let us know so that we can have the biggest and best information on the net about the Endress coat of arms, explained in a simple and easy way.

  • Bavarian crown - 1. Similar to the crown of Spain. Gold circle enriched rhinestones, enhanced by eight florons of acanthus leaves, celery, interspersed with one pearl each, which are held by eight headbands (only five are seen), entered of pearls and locks
  • chair - 1. Rig for horse riding. It is usually represented in profile or front with hanging stirrups. It is preferable to indicate what time comes. 2. The chair as a throne is a symbol of sovereign authority. (V. Mount chairs).
  • Cruz de Santo Domingo - 1. Cruz Flordelisada and Gironada de Plata y Saber, who painted their families of holy trade to their weapons. Also called Cruz de los Preachers.
  • Full Cross - 1. It is said of the cross formed by two crossbars, which touch all sides of the shield. (V. Cruz Full).
  • mill wheel - 1. It is represented with stone, round and striated in different directions with a mast or iron hand in the center or without it. Only half of this wheel is also drawn in some arms shields. Symbol of work, abundance and strength.
  • Old Gironado - 1. It is said of the jironed shield in a cross or cross of San Andrés.
  • Premuro - 1. piece or wall cloth, together with a castle or tower. In some blazons it is represented alone.
  • Privilege shield - 1. granted or confirmed by real mercy.
  • Rosicler - 1. Said by some to color gules. (V. Gules).
  • Royal Crown of Spain - 1. It is formed by a circle of gold enriched with precious stones that support eight flowers, celery leaves, interspersed with one pearl, raised, holding eight headbands loaded with pearls, closed on top and in their union a globe and a
  • shouted out - 1. It applies to any animal that is arrested or taken between ties or networks.
  • Tablecloth - 1. Curvilineal or triangular piece of the curtain or mantelado shield. (V. Cortinated, Mantelado).
  • Torrent - 1. Fast and irregular water course of low length whose course grows abruptly and violently. It is represented between two mountains or rocks, painted with azure and silver color. The abundance of things appears and symbolizes great concurrence of people o
  • town - 1. Unlike the city, it is usually represented by rows of houses on some followed by others and in three or four orders as a belt, in the center a bell tower is usually added to a weather vane. In ancient shields appears l
  • Vulture - 1. This animal is represented in profile or put in front, looking at the right or left of the shield.
  • Weapon chronicler - 1. Official position that a person holds through opposition, which is officially authorized by the Spanish State to extend certificates of weapons, generalogy, nobility with the requirements required by current legislation.